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What celebrity chefs want for their last supper

Written By kom nampuldu on Sabtu, 28 Maret 2015 | 20.49

Photo: Post Composite Graphic

NYC chefs wouldn't want any old loaves and fishes for their final meal.

For the actual Last Supper — commemorated this ­­Thursday — Jesus supposedly dined on tilapia, bread, honeycomb, greens, possibly lamb and wine.

The son of God probably wasn't too fussy, but two milleniums later, when it comes to their own final feasts, popular chefs have very specific ideas. Have a look:

Marc Murphy

Photo: Getty Images/Handout

The Landmarc chef, whose cookbook "Season With Authority" is out next month, says he'd want a bowl of spaghetti carbonara with a "perfect" Italian red wine.

"Carbonara was one of the first dishes I learned to make, and it is one of the most indulgent," he says. "It's a sin worth dying for."

Anita Lo

Photo: Christian Johnston/Shutterstock

"My last supper would definitely have sweetbreads and truffles, two of my favorite ingredients. Nobody makes them better than David Waltuck of Élan [restaurant]," says the Annisa chef. "It would be a sweetbreads dish with freshly shaved truffles that he makes special just for me!"

At her own restaurant, Lo is known for mixing Asian and French fare, and her final feast would do the same.

"There would also need to be sushi," she says, "either something that I caught myself, or from Sushi Nakazawa that featured lots of uni."

Geoffrey Zakarian

Photo: PatrickMcMullan.com/Shutterstock

The Lamb's Club chef, who relaunched Palm Court at the Plaza Hotel in the fall, would want a bowl of fresh pasta with white truffles.

"It celebrates the earth and simplicity and what wonderful things God left us to enjoy," he says. "I would also want a charred rib-eye with barrels of Pétrus [wine]. It's the basic man-food-fire equation updated."

Maria Loi

Photo: Gabi Porter/Getty Images

Her new restaurant, Loi Estiatorio, serves the simple fare of her native Greece, and that's just what she'd want for her last dinner.

"I'd have freshly baked crusty bread with Greek extra virgin olive oil, feta cheese, dried Greek oregano from Mount Taygetos, a perfectly ripe tomato," she says. "These were my favorite things to eat as a child."

Eric Ripert

Photo: Gabi Porter/Shutterstock

The Le Bernardin chef is best known for his seafood preparations, but for his last repast he'd want something from the land.

"Black truffles with bread, olive oil, salt and some good Bordeaux," he says. "It's not your typical last meal. It's very simple, but it's something very special."

Missy Robbins

Photo: Michael Sofronski/Getty Images

She's soon to open an Italian place called Lillia in Williamsburg, and, fittingly, she'd want penne arrabiata and New Haven pizza ­­— plus chocolate chocolate chip ice cream for dessert. "I would wash it all down with bubbly!" she declares.

Wylie Dufresne

Photo: Getty Images (2)

Dufresne is famous for his molecular gastronomy creations, but he'd opt for something more pedestrian.

"I've always known that my last supper would be a cheeseburger with a fried egg on it, accompanied by a bottle of red wine," he says. "The burger would have to be rare, the yolk runny… For added decadence, I would have a side of crispy Popeye's fried chicken."

Donatella Arpaia

Photo: Getty Images/Shutterstock

"I would pick handmade spaghetti with fresh tomato and basil sauce, along with freshly baked focaccia, some thinly sliced prosciutto and burrata," says Arpaia, who recently opened Prova pizzeria.

"My first taste sense memory when I fell in love with food was spaghetti with tomato sauce and basil one summer in Capri. It was love at first bite, and I want it to be my last bite as well."

Daniel Boulud

Photo: FilmMagic/Handout

The toque with restaurants from here to Beijing has lots of far-flung ideas, but if he had to narrow it down, he'd stay close to home.

"If I could only have one meal, I would choose DBGB — I would gather my closest family and friends and serve all the sausages inspired by many of my favorite destinations, such as the truffle boudin blanc with creamy pommes mousseline from Lyon, the red-curry-spiced Thai sausage; the Tunisian lamb and mint sausage and the sweet Italian pork sausage with fennel and chili flakes," he says.

"And I would top all of that with a good bottle from Burgundy!"

Terrance Brennan

Photo: Jonathan Baskin/Gabi Porter

"I would start with Ossetra caviar from the Caspian Sea on buckwheat blinis, with Krug 1990 to celebrate life. Next would be a seafood plateau, with plenty of Belon oysters," says the Picholine chef.

"Then I would move on to margherita pizza with just-made mozzarella."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

6 signs your kid is ready for a dog

As the city thaws after a seemingly endless winter, the parks are again filling with stir-crazy adults, kids and canines alike, enjoying their first warm outdoor ventures of the season.

It's a magical time of year that leaves parents wondering if now is the time to add to their happy brood — with a dog.

The benefits of a family Fido are plentiful, especially for NYC tykes.

"For a child to have someone like that in a big city is very comforting," says Bijan Samawat, a Brooklyn-based dog trainer who operates B&B Dogworks.

But chances are your kid will forget the dog even exists when you pop in a "Frozen" DVD. Our experts reveal how to tell if your mini-me is ready for a furry companion.

3 signs your kid is ready for a dog

She behaves herself around other people's dogs: Age is just a number –  It's your child's behavior around canines that really counts. When you visit a friend who has a dog, does she try to pull Fido's tail or does she wait patiently for the dog to approach her first?

Photo: Getty Images

"The age doesn't matter as long as you teach the kid and the dog to respect each other's space at the same time," says Samawat.

He helps out around the house: Is your kid conscientious about existing chores? If so, he'll likely be good about taking care of a dog — no matter what his age. While a 3-year-old can't be expected to walk a dog, they can set down a dish for feeding.

"Look overall at what level of responsibility your child is ready for," says Denise Daniels, a child development and parenting expert. "If you see them being helpful, they're at a perfect age for a dog."

She's done her research: "Is your kid a super active teenager who wants to deal with getting up every couple of hours to take a puppy out, or a couch potato who might prefer hanging out with a senior dog on their lap all day?" asks Sara Alize Cross, founder and president of Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue.

If she's taken questions such as these into consideration and done research into the temperaments of different breeds, or even the benefits of an adult rescue dog, it's an indicator of responsibility.

3 signs your kid isn't ready for a dog

He's hyper and easily distracted: While both shy and outgoing kids can make good caretakers, those with too much pent-up energy may prove hazardous around a family pet.

"Some kids run around like chickens with their heads cut off," says Cross.

If he discards toys on a whim, he's likely not prepared to make a commitment. "You want to make sure the kid understands this isn't just a toy," Cross adds.

She's about to become a big sister: If you're expecting, it might not be the best time to add more responsibility to your soon-to-be-chaotic household, though plenty do. "You don't realize how overwhelming it will be, no matter how many people tell you," says Daniels of a growing household.

At the very least, skip the puppy and adopt an older, well-behaved rescue dog, adds Samawat.

Her schedule is already full of commitments: If you and your kids are already maxed out on soccer games, band practice and math tutors, then hold off on the new addition for now.

"The main thing you need is time," says Samawat. "I get a lot of people who have a lot of money, but they don't have time to walk the dog, take care of the dog, to train the dog."

If becoming a dog owner is important to your child, she will need to prioritize her commitments and see which ones she's willing to sacrifice in return for a furry friend.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Fair-trade condoms are now a thing

Lauren Singer composts, buys in bulk and has used so little waste over the past two years that all of her trash fits into a mason jar.

But when it comes to sex, she was, until recently, like a lot of women: Sustainability wasn't as big a concern as safe intercourse.

That was until she learned how condoms are made while taking a sustainable economics course at NYU: Mass-marketed rubbers are often produced using toxic chemicals, unfair wages, child labor or production methods that are harmful to the environment.

So Singer ditched the Durex and went fair-trade.

Yes, like coffee, chocolate and cotton, rubbers are now coming under the scrutiny of fair-trade advocates, who say the industry has been overlooked and underserved by cheaply made products.

"I want to be a conscious consumer about everything, from my food to my condoms," says Singer, 23, a Williamsburg resident who runs the Simply Co., a company that sells chemical-free detergent.

Would she actually stop short of having sex without a fair-trade condom? She offers a "no comment."

Sustain CondomsPhoto: Handout

The professor she had at NYU, Jeffrey Hollender, is the founder of Seventh Generation, which sells eco-friendly cleaning products. He's now turning his attention to condoms.

He and his daughter Meika Hollender toured latex plantations around the world to find the best place to responsibly source the rubbers, eventually landing on a place in southern India.

What a lot of people don't know and don't talk about is there is a lot of child labor in the rubber industry says Meika, 27, who lives in the West Village.

In July, the Hollenders debuted Sustain Condoms, the world's first certified fair-trade condoms.

They look and feel like regular condoms (though a female friend reports they left a slightly slimy residue). They're available at Whole Foods and other health stores.

I want to be a conscious consumer about everything, from my food to my condoms. - Lauren Singer

Sustain is hardly the only conscientous condom on the market. In 2013, Tiffany Gaines launched Lovability Inc., a condom company that uses fair-trade latex.

Packaged in cute tins and available at lovabilitycondoms.com, they're designed to appeal to ladies.

"Women are very mindful of the cultural system that's affected by the product they purchase," says Gaines, a 24-year-old Union Square resident.

On top of fair-labor issues, many traditional condoms are made with casein, a milk protein that makes them nonvegan.

The animal issue attracted Rob Blatt, a 33-year-old marketer in Park Slope, to Sir Richard's condoms when he went vegan three years ago.

The brand, which launched its casein-free prophylactics in 2008 and has been moving toward using fair-trade materials, made sense when he started re-examining all the products he used regularly.

But he says he wouldn't refuse to sleep with someone if only a nonvegan condom were available ­— though he's usually packing his own.

"'Always be prepared' is a pretty good motto in this case," he says.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

The reality TV beginnings of how The Who came to be

Who knew The Who came about from a sort-of reality show? The documentary "Lambert & Stamp," out Friday, reveals how the band became successful due to the desire of two men to film the failures and triumphs of a band trying to make its start.

"Lambert & Stamp" refers to Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp, the band's co-managers. Before they were involved in the music business, the two were aspiring filmmakers seeking a subject for a movie.

When Stamp saw London mod band the High Numbers, soon to be renamed The Who, he found their subject.

Chris Stamp and Kit LambertPhoto: Colin Jones/Sony Pictures Classics

The pair approached the band about managing them, despite neither having any knowledge of the music industry. The ultimate ambition was not to become band managers, but film directors.

"They were gonna film everything from all sides, the complete process," says James D. Cooper, director of "Lambert & Stamp."

But the two men were so different on paper that it's surprising they would interact at all.

Stamp, who died of cancer in 2012 at age 70, was the brother of actor Terence Stamp, and a blue-collar kid who grew up surrounded by poverty.

Kit Lambert, who died in 1981 at 45 of a cerebral hemorrhage, was the upper-class son of a composer. He was gay at a time when it was illegal.

They found similarities in their creative ambitions and their outcast natures.

Lambert and Stamp became so close that Who guitarist Pete Townshend says in the film he thought the two were having an affair. While the connection was never romantic or sexual, it was personal and deep.

The Who circa 1968. From left: John Entwistle, Keith Moon, Roger Daltrey and Pete TownshendPhoto: Getty Images

"Chris didn't even know Kit was gay until a year down the road. That was never an issue," says Calixte Stamp, his wife of 33 years. "Chris always spoke of him as a brother."

Early on, Stamp took a job on a film in Norway, and sent his entire salary to The Who to pay their expenses, while Lambert worked with the band back home.

We see in the film that Stamp's family thought the whole endeavor was a bad idea — because they thought The Who were "too ugly" to be successful.

The pair's film idea never came to fruition, but the band took off and managing The Who became the creative endeavor that Lambert and Stamp had been searching for.

The pair influenced the band personally as well as professionally. Lambert convinced Roger Daltrey to keep his wife out of sight, as an unattached singer would work to their benefit.

The Who found modest success in the mid-'60s, with hits like "My Generation." In time, Lambert and the more artistically ambitious Townshend started to discuss classical compositions that the rocker grew up around. Out of this came the rock opera "Tommy."

Ironically, this first big success for The Who signaled the beginning of the end of their relationship with Lambert and Stamp.

The Who's Pete Townshend and Kit LambertPhoto: Tom Wright/Sony Pictures Classics

By the '70s, partying progressed into addiction for the pair — alcohol for Stamp, heroin for Lambert. Things got so bad the band fired the pair, who went their separate ways.

Lambert descended into reclusion as his addiction worsened, and he became a ward of the court. Stamp got sober in 1987 and became an addiction counselor; he went on to rebuild his relationships with Daltrey and Townshend, remaining close with them until his death.

While the end was tragic for one, the story of Lambert and Stamp is still remarkable.

"They thought making a film would [make them] who they wanted to be," says Cooper. "But when they found The Who, they found what they were looking for."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

This week’s couple: Question and answer

Is it possible to fall in love with anyone?

Maybe, if you ask them the right questions, according to psychologist Arthur Aron. He's come up with 36 probing queries that supposedly can make two people fall for each other.

Yossi, 35, and Ariana, 33, tested Aron's theory on their blind date at the Milling Room restaurant on the Upper West Side.

Yossi previously appeared in The Post in an article about the unsuccessful lengths he'd gone to looking for love.

Together, they took the quiz and discussed how they feel about family, relationships and their life goals. They developed a strong connection from the Q&A, but did it really make them fall in love? Read on.

She said

When I met Yossi, I didn't feel chemistry from the get-go, but I was open to getting to know him better.

Soon after we sat down, Yossi asked if I wanted to do the 36 questions, a quiz that is supposed to foster intimacy between potential mates. I was taken a little off guard but I'm pretty open and agreed to it.

We didn't connect romantically, but I think we learned a lot about each other, like what we're most grateful for in life. I appreciated his willingness to be so open.

The Milling Room was amazing. The service was impeccable and I will be dreaming of their Scottish salmon for a long time to come.

Yossi was self-deprecating, which I was not into at first, but I became more empathetic as we got to know each other.

It was definitely one of the more interesting dates I've ever been on. We connected on Facebook before parting ways, and I'd be up for hanging out again as friends.

He said

Upon first sight, Ariana was fine looking and had a warm personality. I was excited to get to know her.

She has been to Africa — Tanzania and Ghana. Since my work in telecom deals a lot with Africa we had a lot in common. We did the 36 questions and got to know each other pretty deeply. It was great.

At the Milling Room, we were treated like royalty. The food was amazing. My beet salad and salmon was incredible.

Ariana was very honest but also a bit too idealistic. That was her only negative trait. Other than that, she was great, and I'd like to hang out with her again. She is definitely a cool chick.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

The reality TV beginnings of how The Who came to be

Who knew The Who came about from a sort-of reality show? The documentary "Lambert & Stamp," out Friday, reveals how the band became successful due to the desire of two men to film the failures and triumphs of a band trying to make its start.

"Lambert & Stamp" refers to Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp, the band's co-managers. Before they were involved in the music business, the two were aspiring filmmakers seeking a subject for a movie.

When Stamp saw London mod band the High Numbers, soon to be renamed The Who, he found their subject.

Chris Stamp and Kit LambertPhoto: Colin Jones/Sony Pictures Classics

The pair approached the band about managing them, despite neither having any knowledge of the music industry. The ultimate ambition was not to become band managers, but film directors.

"They were gonna film everything from all sides, the complete process," says James D. Cooper, director of "Lambert & Stamp."

But the two men were so different on paper that it's surprising they would interact at all.

Stamp, who died of cancer in 2012 at age 70, was the brother of actor Terence Stamp, and a blue-collar kid who grew up surrounded by poverty.

Kit Lambert, who died in 1981 at 45 of a cerebral hemorrhage, was the upper-class son of a composer. He was gay at a time when it was illegal.

They found similarities in their creative ambitions and their outcast natures.

Lambert and Stamp became so close that Who guitarist Pete Townshend says in the film he thought the two were having an affair. While the connection was never romantic or sexual, it was personal and deep.

The Who circa 1968. From left: John Entwistle, Keith Moon, Roger Daltrey and Pete TownshendPhoto: Getty Images

"Chris didn't even know Kit was gay until a year down the road. That was never an issue," says Calixte Stamp, his wife of 33 years. "Chris always spoke of him as a brother."

Early on, Stamp took a job on a film in Norway, and sent his entire salary to The Who to pay their expenses, while Lambert worked with the band back home.

We see in the film that Stamp's family thought the whole endeavor was a bad idea — because they thought The Who were "too ugly" to be successful.

The pair's film idea never came to fruition, but the band took off and managing The Who became the creative endeavor that Lambert and Stamp had been searching for.

The pair influenced the band personally as well as professionally. Lambert convinced Roger Daltrey to keep his wife out of sight, as an unattached singer would work to their benefit.

The Who found modest success in the mid-'60s, with hits like "My Generation." In time, Lambert and the more artistically ambitious Townshend started to discuss classical compositions that the rocker grew up around. Out of this came the rock opera "Tommy."

Ironically, this first big success for The Who signaled the beginning of the end of their relationship with Lambert and Stamp.

The Who's Pete Townshend and Kit LambertPhoto: Tom Wright/Sony Pictures Classics

By the '70s, partying progressed into addiction for the pair — alcohol for Stamp, heroin for Lambert. Things got so bad the band fired the pair, who went their separate ways.

Lambert descended into reclusion as his addiction worsened, and he became a ward of the court. Stamp got sober in 1987 and became an addiction counselor; he went on to rebuild his relationships with Daltrey and Townshend, remaining close with them until his death.

While the end was tragic for one, the story of Lambert and Stamp is still remarkable.

"They thought making a film would [make them] who they wanted to be," says Cooper. "But when they found The Who, they found what they were looking for."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

6 signs your kid is ready for a dog

As the city thaws after a seemingly endless winter, the parks are again filling with stir-crazy adults, kids and canines alike, enjoying their first warm outdoor ventures of the season.

It's a magical time of year that leaves parents wondering if now is the time to add to their happy brood — with a dog.

The benefits of a family Fido are plentiful, especially for NYC tykes.

"For a child to have someone like that in a big city is very comforting," says Bijan Samawat, a Brooklyn-based dog trainer who operates B&B Dogworks.

But chances are your kid will forget the dog even exists when you pop in a "Frozen" DVD. Our experts reveal how to tell if your mini-me is ready for a furry companion.

3 signs your kid is ready for a dog

She behaves herself around other people's dogs: Age is just a number –  It's your child's behavior around canines that really counts. When you visit a friend who has a dog, does she try to pull Fido's tail or does she wait patiently for the dog to approach her first?

Photo: Getty Images

"The age doesn't matter as long as you teach the kid and the dog to respect each other's space at the same time," says Samawat.

He helps out around the house: Is your kid conscientious about existing chores? If so, he'll likely be good about taking care of a dog — no matter what his age. While a 3-year-old can't be expected to walk a dog, they can set down a dish for feeding.

"Look overall at what level of responsibility your child is ready for," says Denise Daniels, a child development and parenting expert. "If you see them being helpful, they're at a perfect age for a dog."

She's done her research: "Is your kid a super active teenager who wants to deal with getting up every couple of hours to take a puppy out, or a couch potato who might prefer hanging out with a senior dog on their lap all day?" asks Sara Alize Cross, founder and president of Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue.

If she's taken questions such as these into consideration and done research into the temperaments of different breeds, or even the benefits of an adult rescue dog, it's an indicator of responsibility.

3 signs your kid isn't ready for a dog

He's hyper and easily distracted: While both shy and outgoing kids can make good caretakers, those with too much pent-up energy may prove hazardous around a family pet.

"Some kids run around like chickens with their heads cut off," says Cross.

If he discards toys on a whim, he's likely not prepared to make a commitment. "You want to make sure the kid understands this isn't just a toy," Cross adds.

She's about to become a big sister: If you're expecting, it might not be the best time to add more responsibility to your soon-to-be-chaotic household, though plenty do. "You don't realize how overwhelming it will be, no matter how many people tell you," says Daniels of a growing household.

At the very least, skip the puppy and adopt an older, well-behaved rescue dog, adds Samawat.

Her schedule is already full of commitments: If you and your kids are already maxed out on soccer games, band practice and math tutors, then hold off on the new addition for now.

"The main thing you need is time," says Samawat. "I get a lot of people who have a lot of money, but they don't have time to walk the dog, take care of the dog, to train the dog."

If becoming a dog owner is important to your child, she will need to prioritize her commitments and see which ones she's willing to sacrifice in return for a furry friend.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Fair-trade condoms are now a thing

Lauren Singer composts, buys in bulk and has used so little waste over the past two years that all of her trash fits into a mason jar.

But when it comes to sex, she was, until recently, like a lot of women: Sustainability wasn't as big a concern as safe intercourse.

That was until she learned how condoms are made while taking a sustainable economics course at NYU: Mass-marketed rubbers are often produced using toxic chemicals, unfair wages, child labor or production methods that are harmful to the environment.

So Singer ditched the Durex and went fair-trade.

Yes, like coffee, chocolate and cotton, rubbers are now coming under the scrutiny of fair-trade advocates, who say the industry has been overlooked and underserved by cheaply made products.

"I want to be a conscious consumer about everything, from my food to my condoms," says Singer, 23, a Williamsburg resident who runs the Simply Co., a company that sells chemical-free detergent.

Would she actually stop short of having sex without a fair-trade condom? She offers a "no comment."

Sustain CondomsPhoto: Handout

The professor she had at NYU, Jeffrey Hollender, is the founder of Seventh Generation, which sells eco-friendly cleaning products. He's now turning his attention to condoms.

He and his daughter Meika Hollender toured latex plantations around the world to find the best place to responsibly source the rubbers, eventually landing on a place in southern India.

What a lot of people don't know and don't talk about is there is a lot of child labor in the rubber industry says Meika, 27, who lives in the West Village.

In July, the Hollenders debuted Sustain Condoms, the world's first certified fair-trade condoms.

They look and feel like regular condoms (though a female friend reports they left a slightly slimy residue). They're available at Whole Foods and other health stores.

I want to be a conscious consumer about everything, from my food to my condoms. - Lauren Singer

Sustain is hardly the only conscientous condom on the market. In 2013, Tiffany Gaines launched Lovability Inc., a condom company that uses fair-trade latex.

Packaged in cute tins and available at lovabilitycondoms.com, they're designed to appeal to ladies.

"Women are very mindful of the cultural system that's affected by the product they purchase," says Gaines, a 24-year-old Union Square resident.

On top of fair-labor issues, many traditional condoms are made with casein, a milk protein that makes them nonvegan.

The animal issue attracted Rob Blatt, a 33-year-old marketer in Park Slope, to Sir Richard's condoms when he went vegan three years ago.

The brand, which launched its casein-free prophylactics in 2008 and has been moving toward using fair-trade materials, made sense when he started re-examining all the products he used regularly.

But he says he wouldn't refuse to sleep with someone if only a nonvegan condom were available ­— though he's usually packing his own.

"'Always be prepared' is a pretty good motto in this case," he says.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

What celebrity chefs want for their last supper

Photo: Post Composite Graphic

NYC chefs wouldn't want any old loaves and fishes for their final meal.

For the actual Last Supper — commemorated this ­­Thursday — Jesus supposedly dined on tilapia, bread, honeycomb, greens, possibly lamb and wine.

The son of God probably wasn't too fussy, but two milleniums later, when it comes to their own final feasts, popular chefs have very specific ideas. Have a look:

Marc Murphy

Photo: Getty Images/Handout

The Landmarc chef, whose cookbook "Season With Authority" is out next month, says he'd want a bowl of spaghetti carbonara with a "perfect" Italian red wine.

"Carbonara was one of the first dishes I learned to make, and it is one of the most indulgent," he says. "It's a sin worth dying for."

Anita Lo

Photo: Christian Johnston/Shutterstock

"My last supper would definitely have sweetbreads and truffles, two of my favorite ingredients. Nobody makes them better than David Waltuck of Élan [restaurant]," says the Annisa chef. "It would be a sweetbreads dish with freshly shaved truffles that he makes special just for me!"

At her own restaurant, Lo is known for mixing Asian and French fare, and her final feast would do the same.

"There would also need to be sushi," she says, "either something that I caught myself, or from Sushi Nakazawa that featured lots of uni."

Geoffrey Zakarian

Photo: PatrickMcMullan.com/Shutterstock

The Lamb's Club chef, who relaunched Palm Court at the Plaza Hotel in the fall, would want a bowl of fresh pasta with white truffles.

"It celebrates the earth and simplicity and what wonderful things God left us to enjoy," he says. "I would also want a charred rib-eye with barrels of Pétrus [wine]. It's the basic man-food-fire equation updated."

Maria Loi

Photo: Gabi Porter/Getty Images

Her new restaurant, Loi Estiatorio, serves the simple fare of her native Greece, and that's just what she'd want for her last dinner.

"I'd have freshly baked crusty bread with Greek extra virgin olive oil, feta cheese, dried Greek oregano from Mount Taygetos, a perfectly ripe tomato," she says. "These were my favorite things to eat as a child."

Eric Ripert

Photo: Gabi Porter/Shutterstock

The Le Bernardin chef is best known for his seafood preparations, but for his last repast he'd want something from the land.

"Black truffles with bread, olive oil, salt and some good Bordeaux," he says. "It's not your typical last meal. It's very simple, but it's something very special."

Missy Robbins

Photo: Michael Sofronski/Getty Images

She's soon to open an Italian place called Lillia in Williamsburg, and, fittingly, she'd want penne arrabiata and New Haven pizza ­­— plus chocolate chocolate chip ice cream for dessert. "I would wash it all down with bubbly!" she declares.

Wylie Dufresne

Photo: Getty Images (2)

Dufresne is famous for his molecular gastronomy creations, but he'd opt for something more pedestrian.

"I've always known that my last supper would be a cheeseburger with a fried egg on it, accompanied by a bottle of red wine," he says. "The burger would have to be rare, the yolk runny… For added decadence, I would have a side of crispy Popeye's fried chicken."

Donatella Arpaia

Photo: Getty Images/Shutterstock

"I would pick handmade spaghetti with fresh tomato and basil sauce, along with freshly baked focaccia, some thinly sliced prosciutto and burrata," says Arpaia, who recently opened Prova pizzeria.

"My first taste sense memory when I fell in love with food was spaghetti with tomato sauce and basil one summer in Capri. It was love at first bite, and I want it to be my last bite as well."

Daniel Boulud

Photo: FilmMagic/Handout

The toque with restaurants from here to Beijing has lots of far-flung ideas, but if he had to narrow it down, he'd stay close to home.

"If I could only have one meal, I would choose DBGB — I would gather my closest family and friends and serve all the sausages inspired by many of my favorite destinations, such as the truffle boudin blanc with creamy pommes mousseline from Lyon, the red-curry-spiced Thai sausage; the Tunisian lamb and mint sausage and the sweet Italian pork sausage with fennel and chili flakes," he says.

"And I would top all of that with a good bottle from Burgundy!"

Terrance Brennan

Photo: Jonathan Baskin/Gabi Porter

"I would start with Ossetra caviar from the Caspian Sea on buckwheat blinis, with Krug 1990 to celebrate life. Next would be a seafood plateau, with plenty of Belon oysters," says the Picholine chef.

"Then I would move on to margherita pizza with just-made mozzarella."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

This week’s couple: Question and answer

Is it possible to fall in love with anyone?

Maybe, if you ask them the right questions, according to psychologist Arthur Aron. He's come up with 36 probing queries that supposedly can make two people fall for each other.

Yossi, 35, and Ariana, 33, tested Aron's theory on their blind date at the Milling Room restaurant on the Upper West Side.

Yossi previously appeared in The Post in an article about the unsuccessful lengths he'd gone to looking for love.

Together, they took the quiz and discussed how they feel about family, relationships and their life goals. They developed a strong connection from the Q&A, but did it really make them fall in love? Read on.

She said

When I met Yossi, I didn't feel chemistry from the get-go, but I was open to getting to know him better.

Soon after we sat down, Yossi asked if I wanted to do the 36 questions, a quiz that is supposed to foster intimacy between potential mates. I was taken a little off guard but I'm pretty open and agreed to it.

We didn't connect romantically, but I think we learned a lot about each other, like what we're most grateful for in life. I appreciated his willingness to be so open.

The Milling Room was amazing. The service was impeccable and I will be dreaming of their Scottish salmon for a long time to come.

Yossi was self-deprecating, which I was not into at first, but I became more empathetic as we got to know each other.

It was definitely one of the more interesting dates I've ever been on. We connected on Facebook before parting ways, and I'd be up for hanging out again as friends.

He said

Upon first sight, Ariana was fine looking and had a warm personality. I was excited to get to know her.

She has been to Africa — Tanzania and Ghana. Since my work in telecom deals a lot with Africa we had a lot in common. We did the 36 questions and got to know each other pretty deeply. It was great.

At the Milling Room, we were treated like royalty. The food was amazing. My beet salad and salmon was incredible.

Ariana was very honest but also a bit too idealistic. That was her only negative trait. Other than that, she was great, and I'd like to hang out with her again. She is definitely a cool chick.


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