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Rob Schneider’s daughter Elle King debuts first rock album

Written By kom nampuldu on Sabtu, 28 Februari 2015 | 20.49

Buying fake IDs and getting into bars are priorities for most adolescents. But when Elle King was a teen, she didn't just do it to party — she did it to perform.

"I played my first show in New York when I was 16," she tells The Post. Her mother, model-turned-doula London King, "found my fake IDs and would cut them up, but I would get another one. Finally, she just said, 'Fine, I'm coming with you' . . . to make sure I didn't drink!"

By the sound of her whiskey- and nicotine rasp, King, 25, hasn't kept completely away from vice. But it certainly helps bring home her love of rock and blues on her recently released debut, "Love Stuff."

Her mom remains King's biggest fan, but less prominent in her life is her father, comic Rob Schneider. The "Saturday Night Live" alum married London King in Vegas in 1988, but they divorced two years later.

Such parentage didn't serve King well in her teens. "I had a beautiful mother and a famous father, and I didn't know where I fit in," she recalls. That, combined with her rebellious personality, meant her personal troubles continued into adulthood. "I moved to Los Angeles for a year when I was 20 and I was hell on wheels!"

Now settled in Brooklyn, King refuses to talk about Schneider, saying only that "we just want the best for each other." She's more effusive about her stepdad, Justin Tesa, who turned her on to music.

"He taught me how to play guitar," she says. "He sends me music to listen to. I call him Daddy J!"


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

RuPaul talks his wild and crazy ‘80s club kid days

These days, RuPaul is most famous for his reality competition show, "RuPaul's Drag Race," which returns for a seventh season Monday at 9 p.m. on Logo. But before the drag superstar's rise to fame, RuPaul Charles, 54, was an '80s club kid — performing his own music, emceeing and go-go dancing.

"I'm from San Diego, Calif. I knew that for my star to shine, I would have to move to New York, become an Andy Warhol superstar and then make my way back to Hollywood," RuPaul tells The Post. "I didn't become an Andy Warhol superstar, but everything else is pretty much how it worked for me. New York, I knew, would get my energy."

Now RuPaul, who splits time between LA and a place in the West Village he's had for 20 years, looks back fondly at his wild and crazy times in the mid- to late-'80s and early '90s.

This is his party New York.

1. Pyramid Club, 101 Avenue A between Sixth and Seventh Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"Because I was sleeping on people's couches, I kept most of my costumes and my stuff in the basement at the Pyramid . . . The Pyramid was the mecca for [Lady Bunny and me]. There was one time when I was go-go dancing [in 1984], and I came down [the] corkscrew stairs that led from the stage to the basement, and I was sweaty. When I got down there, Madonna was holding court with all of her friends in the basement. I remember they all looked at me like I was some jungle person who had invaded their space, because, you know, I'm dressed in some tribal something or whatever. She was that classic mean girl from high school who would turn her nose up at you. It wasn't like she was Kylie Minogue, who is obviously kindness and sweetness. That's not what Madonna was at all — but that's really part of the appeal with her, honestly."

2. Jane West Hotel (now The Jane), 113 Jane St. near West Street

Photo: Helayne Seidman

"[In the beginning,] when I did have money, I would rent a room at the Jane West Hotel — when I was getting some go-go dancing gigs or I could perform to my own songs. It was a dump. It had that distinctive New York smell — it's like a mixture of mold, soot and grime. The only place you can smell that now is in the subway."

3. 333 Rector Place, at South End Ave.

Photo: Lorenzo Ciniglio

"On my new album, 'Realness,' I reunite with the producer I recorded [the 1992 hit] 'Supermodel' with. His name is Eric Kupper, and I recorded 'Supermodel' at his apartment. He had a studio in his living room. I remember looking out the window and I could see the Statue of Liberty during the recording session."

4. Image Production Center, 727 Eleventh Avenue at 52nd Street

Photo: WireImage

"There was a studio there where we filmed the VH1 talk show ['The RuPaul Show,' which premiered in 1996]. We did 100 episodes. Diana Ross, my childhood idol, was my first guest. For me to have made this leap from just a few years prior sleeping on my sister's couch to having my own show and interviewing my idol was quite a reward."

5. Area, formerly 157 Hudson St. between Laight and Hubert Streets

Photo: Getty Images

"I'd see Andy Warhol at a club called Area. Everyone would be talking, 'Oh my God, Andy's here!' because he was the god of our world. His mentality and his philosophy was what we had based our whole lives on, which is this postmodern, punk, create-your-own celebrity. Anyone could be a celebrity with the right clothes and the right attitude."

6. The Hudson Piers, between Charles and West 10th Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"I moved to New York in 1984, and I lived here for six months, sleeping on couches or on the piers before the city spit me back out and I went to Atlanta [for a while]. There were people who were hooking up in cars, because back then you could park your car facing the Hudson, right at the river's edge."

7. Save the Robots, formerly 25, Avenue B between Second and Third Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"[There were] illegal after-hours clubs in the East Village, like Save the Robots. The party scene was gay, straight, lesbian, black, white, rich, poor, uptown, downtown. It wasn't so polarized. You could see the girl on the cover of Vogue and some artist who lives on the street."

8. Tompkins Square Park, Seventh through Tenth Streets between Avenues A and B

Photo: Brian Zak

"I became an overnight downtown star in 1989 when I did Wigstock [in Tompkins Square Park]. I lip-synced to 'Don't You Want My Love' [from] the 'Ruthless People' soundtrack. I think I also did Whitney Houston's 'So Emotional' and that tore the house down too… I had done a lot of campaigning and had been all over the place looking great. People were receptive because I had laid the groundwork for my ascension."
20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

What feminist NYC women really want in a man

"I'll come across the park to meet you," Gary offered, "But I don't know any good brunch-date places there. I'll let you suggest it."

If you're a single woman in New York City, you may have come across some curiously feminist men. I say "curiously feminist" because it's typically in dating where they show the most ardent commitment to equality. No matter how many challenges they have overcome and successes they've achieved, these capable men leave picking the bar or restaurant for the date up to you. And, they make it seem like they are simply respecting your equality.

The 'Mediator' picks an equidistant place: "You're West Village, I'm Midtown East, let's meet in the middle at Columbus Circle."

The 'Manipulator' tells you where he works before asking where you work, making you feel obligated to meet at the "cool" bar near his office. He then compliments you for not being one of those "high-maintenance" women who expect him to trek uptown when his "cool" bar is downtown.

And finally, the 'Negotiator' offers to come to you, but, to even the effort score, has you pick the venue. Gary was a Negotiator.

Having put behind me years of acquiescing to dates that made me feel less feminine, and worse, made the guy seem less masculine, I had my standard reply ready for Gary: "Whichever restaurant you choose, I'm sure I'll enjoy it."

"Otherhood" by Melanie Notkin.

"But I want to take you to a place you like," Gary volleyed back with a pretense of chivalry.

"I trust your taste," I said, putting the decision back on him. "I look forward to meeting you!" I added.

And I did. I like dating. And I love men. And I love being a woman. And I believe there is power in my femininity; being feminine doesn't make me weaker. But for too long I thought I had to meet a man in the middle, literally and figuratively, in order to prove my equality.

A woman's expectations in dating are understandably confusing. Boomers, the first generation with feminist liberty, a k a the women Candace Bushnell began writing about 20 years ago in her seminal "Sex and the City" column in the New York Observer, valued expressing their freedom of equality in dating and sex. But doing research for my book "Otherhood," I found that women of my generation, Gen X, want a remix of traditional and newer values.

They are modern, independent women who want old-fashioned romance. They expect to be valued as a man is at work, and valued as a woman at night. They're natural nurturers but don't want to take care of the date on top of taking care of themselves, their friends and family. They want men who will lean into the date so that they can finally let go and lean back.

By our second date, Gary knew what to do. He texted a restaurant and reservation time. I loved it. There is nothing sexier than a thoughtful and decisive man with a plan.

Gary felt it, too. "I realize now that I've been lazy with women. I put planning the date on them because I didn't feel like doing it. By insisting I do it, you trusted me and that made me feel a man," he emphasized with a growl.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Hey pet owners, stop leaving Fido tied-up while you shop!

On a chilly Saturday night in the West Village, Gia Russo, 35, spotted a French bulldog tied up outside restaurant Louro. But when she inquired with the host inside, none of the patrons appeared to be the pet's owner.

"[The dog] was sitting out there for a very long time in the extreme cold," gripes Russo, a dog-owning attorney from Hoboken, NJ, who eventually received a text from the host confirming that the Frenchie had been retrieved by its owners. "As an animal person, you can't not say something."

Pet pooches tied up on the sidewalk are as frequent a sight in NYC as yellow cabs or corner bodegas — but
recent subfreezing temperatures have got some New Yorkers lashing out at dog owners they consider negligent for leaving Fido exposed to the elements unattended.

"I saw a beagle tied up outside of a cafe the other day — it had only six inches of leash to its tether, was standing on a piece of ice, and it was whining," Jaime Brandenstein, a design director who lives in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, recalls. "So I went into the coffee shop and asked around."

When a woman admitted to being the owner, Brandenstein, 34, told her that her dog was crying. But the owner dismissed her concerns.

"She said, 'Thanks for letting me know,' then turned away from me," Brandenstein angrily remembers.

Photo: Getty Images

Despite her outrage over the situation, Brandenstein says she does tie up her own dachshund outside from time to time — but only if the weather permits and if she can keep an eye on her pooch from indoors.

"It crosses the line when you don't have a visible line of sight or when you're tying them up in the cold," she concludes.

Michelle Wakefield, 47, partner at Cowgirl Hall of Fame in the West Village, knows that her customers are often accompanied by their pups — and goes the extra mile to make sure the pets are happy and healthy.

"We have a bench out front that people will tie their dogs to," Wakefield says. "If someone wants food to-go, then they can tie up their dog outside, come in to order, and we will bring the food out to them."

Leaving your pooch outside for too long can have dire consequences, especially when the temperatures dip and spike in the winter and summer, respectively.

Photo: Getty Images

"If an animal is shivering, it's at risk of being hypothermic," says Dr. Mark Gibson, medical director and owner of Animal Kind Veterinary Hospital in Park Slope. "Huskies and sled dogs may be perfectly fine, but a short-haired breed can freeze to death."

In the summer months, dogs at risk of overheating show signs such as excessive panting or difficulty breathing, drooling and vomiting, according to the ASPCA.

Of course, there are concerns other than the weather when it comes to leaving your pet unsupervised.

The American Kennel Club reports that 637 dogs were "dognapped" across the nation in 2014.

For puppy parents who still opt to tie up their furbabies, sidewalk confrontations may be the least of your worries.

"These days, if you see an animal shivering in the cold it's not long before someone calls the NYPD to investigate," Gibson adds. "And let me tell you, the police take animal abuse very seriously."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

This week’s couple: Dating games

Having something in common is never a bad thing, but is it possible to have too much in common?

For Raven, 26, and Denis, 25, that might have been the case.

Over dinner and drinks at Kingside restaurant in the Viceroy Hotel in Midtown, they hit it off right away, largely due to a mutual love for sports. But the night wasn't quite a home run — both ended the night thinking they'd like to get together again to watch a game, not go out on another date.

She said:

Denis beat me by two minutes, and was at the bar having a beer. I thought, he's my kind of guy — and he's tall and handsome with bright, blueish-green eyes, a great smile, and a generous hairline.

We talked about sports, family, careers, and traveling. I also noticed his manners were probably better than mine. He didn't touch his phone, and he made eye contact when he spoke.

The service at Kingside was incredible; our wine glasses stayed full. The food was fantastic. I recommend the crispy artichokes! We shared everything, which I loved.

We exchanged numbers. Since we are both soccer fans who root for the Tottenham Hotspur F.C. I'm sure I'll see him again, but I think it will be in the friend zone. I didn't feel a romantic spark, even though he was fun to hang out with.

He said:

My first impression of Raven was positive. She was warm, welcoming and easy to talk to right away.

When we started talking sports, the rest of the night became easy. We talked about our college intramural sports days and traded horror stories about seeing people getting hurt playing simple games like kickball or pickup football.

Kingside at the Viceroy Hotel treated us great. We shared wine and all our food. She had steak and my scallops were great too.

My date with Raven was a nice experience. We had a lot in common though it all felt platonic. At the end of the night, we exchanged numbers, and I wouldn't mind hanging out with her again. She seems to be a lot of fun to be around.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Hey pet owners, stop leaving Fido tied-up while you shop!

On a chilly Saturday night in the West Village, Gia Russo, 35, spotted a French bulldog tied up outside restaurant Louro. But when she inquired with the host inside, none of the patrons appeared to be the pet's owner.

"[The dog] was sitting out there for a very long time in the extreme cold," gripes Russo, a dog-owning attorney from Hoboken, NJ, who eventually received a text from the host confirming that the Frenchie had been retrieved by its owners. "As an animal person, you can't not say something."

Pet pooches tied up on the sidewalk are as frequent a sight in NYC as yellow cabs or corner bodegas — but
recent subfreezing temperatures have got some New Yorkers lashing out at dog owners they consider negligent for leaving Fido exposed to the elements unattended.

"I saw a beagle tied up outside of a cafe the other day — it had only six inches of leash to its tether, was standing on a piece of ice, and it was whining," Jaime Brandenstein, a design director who lives in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, recalls. "So I went into the coffee shop and asked around."

When a woman admitted to being the owner, Brandenstein, 34, told her that her dog was crying. But the owner dismissed her concerns.

"She said, 'Thanks for letting me know,' then turned away from me," Brandenstein angrily remembers.

Photo: Getty Images

Despite her outrage over the situation, Brandenstein says she does tie up her own dachshund outside from time to time — but only if the weather permits and if she can keep an eye on her pooch from indoors.

"It crosses the line when you don't have a visible line of sight or when you're tying them up in the cold," she concludes.

Michelle Wakefield, 47, partner at Cowgirl Hall of Fame in the West Village, knows that her customers are often accompanied by their pups — and goes the extra mile to make sure the pets are happy and healthy.

"We have a bench out front that people will tie their dogs to," Wakefield says. "If someone wants food to-go, then they can tie up their dog outside, come in to order, and we will bring the food out to them."

Leaving your pooch outside for too long can have dire consequences, especially when the temperatures dip and spike in the winter and summer, respectively.

Photo: Getty Images

"If an animal is shivering, it's at risk of being hypothermic," says Dr. Mark Gibson, medical director and owner of Animal Kind Veterinary Hospital in Park Slope. "Huskies and sled dogs may be perfectly fine, but a short-haired breed can freeze to death."

In the summer months, dogs at risk of overheating show signs such as excessive panting or difficulty breathing, drooling and vomiting, according to the ASPCA.

Of course, there are concerns other than the weather when it comes to leaving your pet unsupervised.

The American Kennel Club reports that 637 dogs were "dognapped" across the nation in 2014.

For puppy parents who still opt to tie up their furbabies, sidewalk confrontations may be the least of your worries.

"These days, if you see an animal shivering in the cold it's not long before someone calls the NYPD to investigate," Gibson adds. "And let me tell you, the police take animal abuse very seriously."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Rob Schneider’s daughter Elle King debuts first rock album

Buying fake IDs and getting into bars are priorities for most adolescents. But when Elle King was a teen, she didn't just do it to party — she did it to perform.

"I played my first show in New York when I was 16," she tells The Post. Her mother, model-turned-doula London King, "found my fake IDs and would cut them up, but I would get another one. Finally, she just said, 'Fine, I'm coming with you' . . . to make sure I didn't drink!"

By the sound of her whiskey- and nicotine rasp, King, 25, hasn't kept completely away from vice. But it certainly helps bring home her love of rock and blues on her recently released debut, "Love Stuff."

Her mom remains King's biggest fan, but less prominent in her life is her father, comic Rob Schneider. The "Saturday Night Live" alum married London King in Vegas in 1988, but they divorced two years later.

Such parentage didn't serve King well in her teens. "I had a beautiful mother and a famous father, and I didn't know where I fit in," she recalls. That, combined with her rebellious personality, meant her personal troubles continued into adulthood. "I moved to Los Angeles for a year when I was 20 and I was hell on wheels!"

Now settled in Brooklyn, King refuses to talk about Schneider, saying only that "we just want the best for each other." She's more effusive about her stepdad, Justin Tesa, who turned her on to music.

"He taught me how to play guitar," she says. "He sends me music to listen to. I call him Daddy J!"


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

What feminist NYC women really want in a man

"I'll come across the park to meet you," Gary offered, "But I don't know any good brunch-date places there. I'll let you suggest it."

If you're a single woman in New York City, you may have come across some curiously feminist men. I say "curiously feminist" because it's typically in dating where they show the most ardent commitment to equality. No matter how many challenges they have overcome and successes they've achieved, these capable men leave picking the bar or restaurant for the date up to you. And, they make it seem like they are simply respecting your equality.

The 'Mediator' picks an equidistant place: "You're West Village, I'm Midtown East, let's meet in the middle at Columbus Circle."

The 'Manipulator' tells you where he works before asking where you work, making you feel obligated to meet at the "cool" bar near his office. He then compliments you for not being one of those "high-maintenance" women who expect him to trek uptown when his "cool" bar is downtown.

And finally, the 'Negotiator' offers to come to you, but, to even the effort score, has you pick the venue. Gary was a Negotiator.

Having put behind me years of acquiescing to dates that made me feel less feminine, and worse, made the guy seem less masculine, I had my standard reply ready for Gary: "Whichever restaurant you choose, I'm sure I'll enjoy it."

"Otherhood" by Melanie Notkin.

"But I want to take you to a place you like," Gary volleyed back with a pretense of chivalry.

"I trust your taste," I said, putting the decision back on him. "I look forward to meeting you!" I added.

And I did. I like dating. And I love men. And I love being a woman. And I believe there is power in my femininity; being feminine doesn't make me weaker. But for too long I thought I had to meet a man in the middle, literally and figuratively, in order to prove my equality.

A woman's expectations in dating are understandably confusing. Boomers, the first generation with feminist liberty, a k a the women Candace Bushnell began writing about 20 years ago in her seminal "Sex and the City" column in the New York Observer, valued expressing their freedom of equality in dating and sex. But doing research for my book "Otherhood," I found that women of my generation, Gen X, want a remix of traditional and newer values.

They are modern, independent women who want old-fashioned romance. They expect to be valued as a man is at work, and valued as a woman at night. They're natural nurturers but don't want to take care of the date on top of taking care of themselves, their friends and family. They want men who will lean into the date so that they can finally let go and lean back.

By our second date, Gary knew what to do. He texted a restaurant and reservation time. I loved it. There is nothing sexier than a thoughtful and decisive man with a plan.

Gary felt it, too. "I realize now that I've been lazy with women. I put planning the date on them because I didn't feel like doing it. By insisting I do it, you trusted me and that made me feel a man," he emphasized with a growl.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

This week’s couple: Dating games

Having something in common is never a bad thing, but is it possible to have too much in common?

For Raven, 26, and Denis, 25, that might have been the case.

Over dinner and drinks at Kingside restaurant in the Viceroy Hotel in Midtown, they hit it off right away, largely due to a mutual love for sports. But the night wasn't quite a home run — both ended the night thinking they'd like to get together again to watch a game, not go out on another date.

She said:

Denis beat me by two minutes, and was at the bar having a beer. I thought, he's my kind of guy — and he's tall and handsome with bright, blueish-green eyes, a great smile, and a generous hairline.

We talked about sports, family, careers, and traveling. I also noticed his manners were probably better than mine. He didn't touch his phone, and he made eye contact when he spoke.

The service at Kingside was incredible; our wine glasses stayed full. The food was fantastic. I recommend the crispy artichokes! We shared everything, which I loved.

We exchanged numbers. Since we are both soccer fans who root for the Tottenham Hotspur F.C. I'm sure I'll see him again, but I think it will be in the friend zone. I didn't feel a romantic spark, even though he was fun to hang out with.

He said:

My first impression of Raven was positive. She was warm, welcoming and easy to talk to right away.

When we started talking sports, the rest of the night became easy. We talked about our college intramural sports days and traded horror stories about seeing people getting hurt playing simple games like kickball or pickup football.

Kingside at the Viceroy Hotel treated us great. We shared wine and all our food. She had steak and my scallops were great too.

My date with Raven was a nice experience. We had a lot in common though it all felt platonic. At the end of the night, we exchanged numbers, and I wouldn't mind hanging out with her again. She seems to be a lot of fun to be around.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

RuPaul talks his wild and crazy ‘80s club kid days

These days, RuPaul is most famous for his reality competition show, "RuPaul's Drag Race," which returns for a seventh season Monday at 9 p.m. on Logo. But before the drag superstar's rise to fame, RuPaul Charles, 54, was an '80s club kid — performing his own music, emceeing and go-go dancing.

"I'm from San Diego, Calif. I knew that for my star to shine, I would have to move to New York, become an Andy Warhol superstar and then make my way back to Hollywood," RuPaul tells The Post. "I didn't become an Andy Warhol superstar, but everything else is pretty much how it worked for me. New York, I knew, would get my energy."

Now RuPaul, who splits time between LA and a place in the West Village he's had for 20 years, looks back fondly at his wild and crazy times in the mid- to late-'80s and early '90s.

This is his party New York.

1. Pyramid Club, 101 Avenue A between Sixth and Seventh Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"Because I was sleeping on people's couches, I kept most of my costumes and my stuff in the basement at the Pyramid . . . The Pyramid was the mecca for [Lady Bunny and me]. There was one time when I was go-go dancing [in 1984], and I came down [the] corkscrew stairs that led from the stage to the basement, and I was sweaty. When I got down there, Madonna was holding court with all of her friends in the basement. I remember they all looked at me like I was some jungle person who had invaded their space, because, you know, I'm dressed in some tribal something or whatever. She was that classic mean girl from high school who would turn her nose up at you. It wasn't like she was Kylie Minogue, who is obviously kindness and sweetness. That's not what Madonna was at all — but that's really part of the appeal with her, honestly."

2. Jane West Hotel (now The Jane), 113 Jane St. near West Street

Photo: Helayne Seidman

"[In the beginning,] when I did have money, I would rent a room at the Jane West Hotel — when I was getting some go-go dancing gigs or I could perform to my own songs. It was a dump. It had that distinctive New York smell — it's like a mixture of mold, soot and grime. The only place you can smell that now is in the subway."

3. 333 Rector Place, at South End Ave.

Photo: Lorenzo Ciniglio

"On my new album, 'Realness,' I reunite with the producer I recorded [the 1992 hit] 'Supermodel' with. His name is Eric Kupper, and I recorded 'Supermodel' at his apartment. He had a studio in his living room. I remember looking out the window and I could see the Statue of Liberty during the recording session."

4. Image Production Center, 727 Eleventh Avenue at 52nd Street

Photo: WireImage

"There was a studio there where we filmed the VH1 talk show ['The RuPaul Show,' which premiered in 1996]. We did 100 episodes. Diana Ross, my childhood idol, was my first guest. For me to have made this leap from just a few years prior sleeping on my sister's couch to having my own show and interviewing my idol was quite a reward."

5. Area, formerly 157 Hudson St. between Laight and Hubert Streets

Photo: Getty Images

"I'd see Andy Warhol at a club called Area. Everyone would be talking, 'Oh my God, Andy's here!' because he was the god of our world. His mentality and his philosophy was what we had based our whole lives on, which is this postmodern, punk, create-your-own celebrity. Anyone could be a celebrity with the right clothes and the right attitude."

6. The Hudson Piers, between Charles and West 10th Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"I moved to New York in 1984, and I lived here for six months, sleeping on couches or on the piers before the city spit me back out and I went to Atlanta [for a while]. There were people who were hooking up in cars, because back then you could park your car facing the Hudson, right at the river's edge."

7. Save the Robots, formerly 25, Avenue B between Second and Third Streets

Photo: Christian Johnston

"[There were] illegal after-hours clubs in the East Village, like Save the Robots. The party scene was gay, straight, lesbian, black, white, rich, poor, uptown, downtown. It wasn't so polarized. You could see the girl on the cover of Vogue and some artist who lives on the street."

8. Tompkins Square Park, Seventh through Tenth Streets between Avenues A and B

Photo: Brian Zak

"I became an overnight downtown star in 1989 when I did Wigstock [in Tompkins Square Park]. I lip-synced to 'Don't You Want My Love' [from] the 'Ruthless People' soundtrack. I think I also did Whitney Houston's 'So Emotional' and that tore the house down too… I had done a lot of campaigning and had been all over the place looking great. People were receptive because I had laid the groundwork for my ascension."
18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More
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