Diberdayakan oleh Blogger.

Popular Posts Today

The Post endorses John Burnett for city comptroller

Written By kom nampuldu on Kamis, 31 Oktober 2013 | 20.49

The city comptroller is at once New York's most important and least understood office.

It's important because the comptroller oversees audits of city agencies as well as the city's $140 billion in pension funds. It's not well understood because most of the comptroller's work is done behind the scenes, where the billions in pension dollars gives him significant leverage over decisions by both the private and public sectors.

Earlier this year, The Post helped fend off a grave threat to the city's future when we supported Scott Stringer over Eliot Spitzer in the Democratic primary. We made that choice primarily because Stringer has none of the pathologies that made the prospect of a Comptroller Spitzer so menacing. For that worthy goal — keeping Spitzer safely out of power — we were glad to support a conventional liberal such as Stringer.

Today The Post endorses his Republican rival, John Burnett, in the general election. Like Stringer when we supported him, Burnett today finds himself down in the polls. But on principle, he is the superior candidate.

In this race, he's emphasized all the right things — primarily, his fiduciary obligations to taxpayers and pensioners who depend on him to get good value for their money. He also has the right financial experience for the job. On top of it all, Burnett has a personal story — that of an African-American who rose from the projects to make it on Wall Street — that is itself a message of hope about what hard work and good values can accomplish.

We'd like to see more New York Republican candidates in the Burnett mold — and better support from the party when they run. So we urge New Yorkers who care about this city's future to pull the lever for John Burnett on Election Day.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Obamacare rollout makes the case for small government

This is smart government?

In the days after the 2008 election, when Barack Obama was putting together his team, the president-elect declared that "what the American people want more than anything is just common sense, smart government." He repeated this theme in his first inaugural, when he promised "government that works."

We thought of these words as we watched the president's Health and Human Services secretary, Kathleen Sebelius, flounder her way through even the most basic questions about ObamaCare.

How many people had signed up? Not sure, because the data isn't reliable. Weren't you warned about problems? Yes, but no one had any idea they were this serious. What about the security? Well, we really can't say for certain. As if to underscore the debacle, the HealthCare.gov Web site was down during most of her testimony.

The question is, why? Remember, this rollout was put together by the smart people. They had Silicon Valley at their disposal. They had the elite universities. They were hailed for their innovative use of social media during their campaigns.

Yet when it came to the signature issue of the Obama presidency, with years to prepare, they put up a Web site that has more bugs than a Brazilian rain forest.

Today, President Obama, Sebelius and their team are no longer telling us how smart they are. They have now switched to saying how dumb you are to fixate on the president's repeated promise, that if you liked your health-care plan and your doctors, you could keep them. Apparently, you are way too stupid to appreciate that ObamaCare is giving you something better.

Be thankful for inadvertent blessings. For a president and health and human services secretary who came to office promising smart government are now doing more to advance the conservative argument for smaller, more limited government than Republicans could ever hope to.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Bidding for Banksy ‘Nazi’ painting reaches $300G

The high bid on a Nazi-themed painting donated by Banksy to a charity auction topped $300,000 Wednesday — with another 24 hours left before the clock runs out.

"It's easily a record. We just couldn't be more thrilled," said Rebecca Edmondson, spokeswoman for Housing Works, which will get 100 percent of whatever the artwork brings in.

The oil-on-oil painting appeared in the window of the charity's thrift shop on East 23rd Street in Gramercy Tuesday, as Banksy headed into the last leg of his monthlong "Better Out Than In" New York City tagging tour.

After the piece was authenticated, Housing Works — which focuses on homelessness and HIV-AIDS issues — wasted no time putting it up for sale.

Banksy aficionados predicted the art would fetch at least $1 million.

Meanwhile the artist's latest piece popped up in The Bronx Wednesday night.

Christopher Sadowski

A man in an inflatable suit poses in front of Banksy's latest piece.

A stenciled work of a spotted cat called "Bronx Zoo" was displayed on the wall of an abandoned building across from Yankee Stadium.

His monthlong New York "residency" is expected to end Thursday.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Mayoral race draws ‘Rocky IV’ comparisons

So much for loyalty.

Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio dodged and weaved rather than defend his former boss, Mayor David Dinkins, when it came to comparing him to former Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

During the third and final televised debate, de Blasio, who had been a low-level aide during the Dinkins administration, evaded the question when asked whether voters would prefer a Dinkins or Giuliani era.

"I think voters are looking ahead," said de Blasio, the public advocate. "I think they're not caught up in what the city was like 20 years ago — they want to talk about solutions today."

Lhota, who was deputy mayor for Giuliani, didn't hesitate to draw a distinction between the two leaders — pointing to a reduction in crime rates and an enhanced quality of life in the city under Giuliani.

"I'll take the Giuliani years over the Dinkins years anytime," said Lhota, who has been warning of a return to the high crime rate of the 1980s if de Blasio wins City Hall. "There's no reason to go back to that period of time — which was a horror."

The 90-minute debate saw the candidates get into fewer testy exchanges than in the two prior meetings, but Lhota predicted that he'd score a surprise knockout in Tuesday's election.

"These comments about attaching me to the national Republican Party, it reminds me of that boxing match between Rocky and Drago," said Lhota, referring to the hero and villain in the film "Rocky IV."

"I mean, quite honestly, we know what happened in that match — the underdog won," said Lhota, just hours after a Quinnipiac Poll showed him down 39 points among likely voters.

"New York City loves an underdog. I am that underdog."

Moments later, Lhota's campaign tweeted a picture of de Blasio's head superimposed on Drago's body — sporting red, Soviet shorts.

After the debate, de Blasio lightheartedly gave his best Rocky rebuttal.

"I'm a big [Sylvester] Stallone fan, so I personally relate more to the Rocky character," he said.

"I started out as the underdog for sure," de Blasio added of the Democratic primary, where he had initially polled in fourth place. "I was the underdog for a long time."

During a lightning round of questions, Lhota and de Blasio each estimated that their families spent $400 to $450 on groceries per month — a small amount for families of three and four, respectively.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Shrink faces 10 years in jail for Medicare fraud

A crooked Brooklyn shrink faces a decade in jail after pleading guilty Wednesday to lying about treating veterans while he was actually vacationing in China — bilking Medicare out of more than $1 million.

Dr. Mikail Presman, who was fired from his full-time job at the Brooklyn VA Hospital, copped to the charges in Brooklyn federal court, and faces $3.6 million in fines and restitution in addition to potential prison time, prosecutors said.

Presman, 56, claimed to have treated a steady parade of patients at his home between 2006 and 2013, billing Medicare for millions, according to court papers.

But many of the visits never happened, and investigators discovered that he was gallivanting around China with his family during some of the phantom treatments.

"Dr. Presman was hired and paid by the taxpayers to treat those who sacrifice so much for our country — our injured veterans," said US Attorney Loretta Lynch. "As alleged, by defrauding the Medicare program, he betrayed the trust placed in him and stole from the very taxpayers who paid his salary. Far from honoring their sacrifice, Dr. Presman used our veterans as a cover for deceit and fraud."

Presman, who is free on bond, would not comment as he walked out of court with his wife and daughter.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Shrink faces 10 years in jail for Medicare fraud

A crooked Brooklyn shrink faces a decade in jail after pleading guilty Wednesday to lying about treating veterans while he was actually vacationing in China — bilking Medicare out of more than $1 million.

Dr. Mikail Presman, who was fired from his full-time job at the Brooklyn VA Hospital, copped to the charges in Brooklyn federal court, and faces $3.6 million in fines and restitution in addition to potential prison time, prosecutors said.

Presman, 56, claimed to have treated a steady parade of patients at his home between 2006 and 2013, billing Medicare for millions, according to court papers.

But many of the visits never happened, and investigators discovered that he was gallivanting around China with his family during some of the phantom treatments.

"Dr. Presman was hired and paid by the taxpayers to treat those who sacrifice so much for our country — our injured veterans," said US Attorney Loretta Lynch. "As alleged, by defrauding the Medicare program, he betrayed the trust placed in him and stole from the very taxpayers who paid his salary. Far from honoring their sacrifice, Dr. Presman used our veterans as a cover for deceit and fraud."

Presman, who is free on bond, would not comment as he walked out of court with his wife and daughter.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Mayoral race draws ‘Rocky IV’ comparisons

So much for loyalty.

Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio dodged and weaved rather than defend his former boss, Mayor David Dinkins, when it came to comparing him to former Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

During the third and final televised debate, de Blasio, who had been a low-level aide during the Dinkins administration, evaded the question when asked whether voters would prefer a Dinkins or Giuliani era.

"I think voters are looking ahead," said de Blasio, the public advocate. "I think they're not caught up in what the city was like 20 years ago — they want to talk about solutions today."

Lhota, who was deputy mayor for Giuliani, didn't hesitate to draw a distinction between the two leaders — pointing to a reduction in crime rates and an enhanced quality of life in the city under Giuliani.

"I'll take the Giuliani years over the Dinkins years anytime," said Lhota, who has been warning of a return to the high crime rate of the 1980s if de Blasio wins City Hall. "There's no reason to go back to that period of time — which was a horror."

The 90-minute debate saw the candidates get into fewer testy exchanges than in the two prior meetings, but Lhota predicted that he'd score a surprise knockout in Tuesday's election.

"These comments about attaching me to the national Republican Party, it reminds me of that boxing match between Rocky and Drago," said Lhota, referring to the hero and villain in the film "Rocky IV."

"I mean, quite honestly, we know what happened in that match — the underdog won," said Lhota, just hours after a Quinnipiac Poll showed him down 39 points among likely voters.

"New York City loves an underdog. I am that underdog."

Moments later, Lhota's campaign tweeted a picture of de Blasio's head superimposed on Drago's body — sporting red, Soviet shorts.

After the debate, de Blasio lightheartedly gave his best Rocky rebuttal.

"I'm a big [Sylvester] Stallone fan, so I personally relate more to the Rocky character," he said.

"I started out as the underdog for sure," de Blasio added of the Democratic primary, where he had initially polled in fourth place. "I was the underdog for a long time."

During a lightning round of questions, Lhota and de Blasio each estimated that their families spent $400 to $450 on groceries per month — a small amount for families of three and four, respectively.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

The Post endorses John Burnett for city comptroller

The city comptroller is at once New York's most important and least understood office.

It's important because the comptroller oversees audits of city agencies as well as the city's $140 billion in pension funds. It's not well understood because most of the comptroller's work is done behind the scenes, where the billions in pension dollars gives him significant leverage over decisions by both the private and public sectors.

Earlier this year, The Post helped fend off a grave threat to the city's future when we supported Scott Stringer over Eliot Spitzer in the Democratic primary. We made that choice primarily because Stringer has none of the pathologies that made the prospect of a Comptroller Spitzer so menacing. For that worthy goal — keeping Spitzer safely out of power — we were glad to support a conventional liberal such as Stringer.

Today The Post endorses his Republican rival, John Burnett, in the general election. Like Stringer when we supported him, Burnett today finds himself down in the polls. But on principle, he is the superior candidate.

In this race, he's emphasized all the right things — primarily, his fiduciary obligations to taxpayers and pensioners who depend on him to get good value for their money. He also has the right financial experience for the job. On top of it all, Burnett has a personal story — that of an African-American who rose from the projects to make it on Wall Street — that is itself a message of hope about what hard work and good values can accomplish.

We'd like to see more New York Republican candidates in the Burnett mold — and better support from the party when they run. So we urge New Yorkers who care about this city's future to pull the lever for John Burnett on Election Day.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Obamacare rollout makes the case for small government

This is smart government?

In the days after the 2008 election, when Barack Obama was putting together his team, the president-elect declared that "what the American people want more than anything is just common sense, smart government." He repeated this theme in his first inaugural, when he promised "government that works."

We thought of these words as we watched the president's Health and Human Services secretary, Kathleen Sebelius, flounder her way through even the most basic questions about ObamaCare.

How many people had signed up? Not sure, because the data isn't reliable. Weren't you warned about problems? Yes, but no one had any idea they were this serious. What about the security? Well, we really can't say for certain. As if to underscore the debacle, the HealthCare.gov Web site was down during most of her testimony.

The question is, why? Remember, this rollout was put together by the smart people. They had Silicon Valley at their disposal. They had the elite universities. They were hailed for their innovative use of social media during their campaigns.

Yet when it came to the signature issue of the Obama presidency, with years to prepare, they put up a Web site that has more bugs than a Brazilian rain forest.

Today, President Obama, Sebelius and their team are no longer telling us how smart they are. They have now switched to saying how dumb you are to fixate on the president's repeated promise, that if you liked your health-care plan and your doctors, you could keep them. Apparently, you are way too stupid to appreciate that ObamaCare is giving you something better.

Be thankful for inadvertent blessings. For a president and health and human services secretary who came to office promising smart government are now doing more to advance the conservative argument for smaller, more limited government than Republicans could ever hope to.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Bidding for Banksy ‘Nazi’ painting reaches $300G

The high bid on a Nazi-themed painting donated by Banksy to a charity auction topped $300,000 Wednesday — with another 24 hours left before the clock runs out.

"It's easily a record. We just couldn't be more thrilled," said Rebecca Edmondson, spokeswoman for Housing Works, which will get 100 percent of whatever the artwork brings in.

The oil-on-oil painting appeared in the window of the charity's thrift shop on East 23rd Street in Gramercy Tuesday, as Banksy headed into the last leg of his monthlong "Better Out Than In" New York City tagging tour.

After the piece was authenticated, Housing Works — which focuses on homelessness and HIV-AIDS issues — wasted no time putting it up for sale.

Banksy aficionados predicted the art would fetch at least $1 million.

Meanwhile the artist's latest piece popped up in The Bronx Wednesday night.

Christopher Sadowski

A man in an inflatable suit poses in front of Banksy's latest piece.

A stenciled work of a spotted cat called "Bronx Zoo" was displayed on the wall of an abandoned building across from Yankee Stadium.

His monthlong New York "residency" is expected to end Thursday.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Dexter’ headed to Netflix

Written By kom nampuldu on Rabu, 30 Oktober 2013 | 18.18

Netflix has struck a deal to begin streaming "Dexter," which ended its eight-season run on Showtime late last month.

Under the new deal with CBS Corp., the first four seasons of "Dexter" (Michael C. Hall) will be available on Netflix beginning this Thursday, Halloween.

Seasons 5-8 will be available on Neftlix beginning Jan. 1.

Hall earned a Golden Globe for his role as Dexter Morgan, a Miami forensics expert who moonlights as a serial killer.

The series premiered on Showtime in 2006.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Craig Ferguson to host syndicated game show

'Late Late Show" host Craig Ferguson is spreading his TV wings.

Starting next fall, Ferguson will host a syndicated half-hour game show called "Celebrity Name Game," developed by ex-"Friends" star Courteney Cox and her former husband, David Arquette.

The show, produced by FremantleMedia North America and Debmar-Mercury ("The Wendy Williams Show," "Family Feud"), will feature Ferguson teaming with celebrity contestants to identify famous names from all facets of life (including cartoon characters).

It's the second of Debmar-Mercury's game shows to feature a talk-show host; "Family Feud" is hosted by Steve Harvey, who also hosts the syndicated "Steve Harvey," now in its second season.

Ferguson, 51, has hosted "Late Late Show" on CBS since January 2005.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Made in Jersey’ actress moves to ‘Salem’

Janet Montgomery has been cast as the lead in WGN America's upcoming drama series "Salem," about the Massachusetts town's infamous witch trials.

Montgomery, who toplined last fall's short-lived CBS drama "Made in Jersey," will play Mary Sibley, the ruthless yet vulnerable wife of one of the wealthy town selectmen.

The British actress previously co-starred in "Dancing on the Edge" (Starz), "Entourage" (HBO) and "Human Target" (Fox).

The 17th century-set "Salem" is WGN America's first scripted series and hails from creators Brandon Braga ("24") and Adam Simon and studio Fox21 ("Homeland"). The network has ordered 13 episodes to premiere in 2014.

Xander Berkeley ("Nikita") has also joined the cast as a regular in the role of Magistrate Hale, one of Salem's selectmen.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

TV specials, promotions commemorate Kennedy death anniversary

The onslaught of TV specials and related events commemorating the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination (Nov. 22, 1963) will begin shortly — with Nat Geo first out of the gate.

The network is promoting its upcoming movie "Killing Kennedy" (starring Rob Lowe as JFK) with a '60s-style newsstand showcasing iconic magazine covers from 1957-63 encompassing both JFK and his assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. The newsstand — on display here next week — will also include front-page newspaper headlines from Nov. 23, 1963, the day after JFK's assassination in Dallas. The newsstand will be at Penn Station next Tuesday, Nov. 5, at Herald Square (Nov. 6) and at Columbus Circle (Nov. 7) — with people dressed in '60s-era garb passing out reproductions of the newspapers as well as real JFK half-dollar coins. "Killing Kennedy" premieres Nov. 10 (8 p.m.), with co-stars Will Rothhaar (Oswald), Ginnifer Goodwin (Jackie Kennedy) and Michelle Trachtenberg (Marina Oswald).

Belushi: Maybe this time?

Here: Don't know about you, but I'd file this one in the "just a wee bit disturbing" folder: 85-year-old Dr. Ruth Westheimer — better known as "Dr. Ruth" — is returning to the land of TV with a new talk show. Granted, "The Wisdom of Dr. Ruth Westheimer" will be only 15 minutes long (airing weekly) and granted, it will air on niche network Shalom TV (premiering Nov. 18), but still . . .

And there: Emile Hirsch, who's playing Clyde Barrow in A&E's upcoming miniseries "Bonnie & Clyde," has been cast as John Belushi in Steve Conrad's biopic of the hard-charging TV and movie star ("Saturday Night Live," "Animal House") who died in 1982 at the age of 33. Hopefully Hirsch, 28, will have better luck than a pre-"Commish"/"The Shield" star Michael Chiklis who, back in 1989, played Belushi in the big-screen stinker, "Wired," based on Bob Woodward's best-seller. That movie was pilloried by Belushi's widow, Judith; this one's based on her book, "Belushi: A Biography." So there.

Last, but not least . . .

Armand Assante will be at Sterling Gardens (Matawan, NJ) this Saturday for a dinner/cigar-sampling (Ora Vivo cigars). Call (732) 758-8126 for information . . . Ch. 4's Bruce Beck emcees Wednesday's President's Dinner (St. John's) at the Waldorf . . . Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" will include a tribute to Marcia Wallace, who died last Friday at 70 and played Edna Krabappel. She's best-known to older TV viewers as Carol, Bob Newhart's secretary on "The Bob Newhart Show" . . . John Gabriel is joined by his old pal Charles Grodin for a night of comedy and song Dec. 8 at The Metropolitan Room (West 22nd) . . . MSG "Halls of Fame" host Fran Healy at Flex Mussels Restaurant (82nd St.)


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

ABC apologizes for ‘Kill everyone in China’ remark on Kimmel

After more than a week of escalating criticism, ABC is apologizing for a segment of "Jimmy Kimmel Live" in which a child joked about killing Chinese people.

The network said the offensive skit will be edited out of the late-night talk show's episode for future airings or any other distribution, including online.

The controversy erupted after an Oct. 16 comedy bit in which Kimmel asked a "Kids Table" of youngsters to comment on recent news events, such as the federal government shutdown. At one point, Kimmel asked the kids what the United States should do to end its growing debt to China.

"America owes China a lot of money, $1.3 trillion," he said. "How should we pay them back?"

"Kill everyone in China!" a 6-year-old boy exclaimed.

Kimmel joked, "That's an interesting idea" and laughed.

Another panelist suggested, ironically, that China should be separated from the rest of the world by a large wall.

Later Kimmel asked the youngsters, "Should we allow the Chinese to live?" The four kids, aged 6 and 7, were divided.

A video excerpt of the skit quickly went viral and prompted bloggers to wonder why ABC was shrugging off an attempt at humor that might have annoyed one billion people.

The segment also triggered an online petition to President Obama demanding that ABC "cut the show" and issue a formal apology for the skit they said bore a resemblance to Nazi treatment of Jews.

"The kids might not know anything better," the petition said. "However, Jimmy Kimmel and ABC's management are adults. They had a choice not to air this racist program, which promotes racial hatred."

More than 60,000 people had signed the petition within nine days of its posting on the White House "We The People" Web site. The demand also called for an investigation of the show.

ABC responded in an Oct. 15 letter, disclosed Monday, to a group called 80-20 that identifies itself as a pan-Asian-American political organization.

"We're writing to offer our sincere apology," the letter began. It said the network "would never purposefully do anything to upset" the Chinese, Asian or other communities.

"Our objective is to entertain," the letter added.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Dexter’ headed to Netflix

Written By kom nampuldu on Selasa, 29 Oktober 2013 | 20.50

Netflix has struck a deal to begin streaming "Dexter," which ended its eight-season run on Showtime late last month.

Under the new deal with CBS Corp., the first four seasons of "Dexter" (Michael C. Hall) will be available on Netflix beginning this Thursday, Halloween.

Seasons 5-8 will be available on Neftlix beginning Jan. 1.

Hall earned a Golden Globe for his role as Dexter Morgan, a Miami forensics expert who moonlights as a serial killer.

The series premiered on Showtime in 2006.


20.50 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Made in Jersey’ actress moves to ‘Salem’

Janet Montgomery has been cast as the lead in WGN America's upcoming drama series "Salem," about the Massachusetts town's infamous witch trials.

Montgomery, who toplined last fall's short-lived CBS drama "Made in Jersey," will play Mary Sibley, the ruthless yet vulnerable wife of one of the wealthy town selectmen.

The British actress previously co-starred in "Dancing on the Edge" (Starz), "Entourage" (HBO) and "Human Target" (Fox).

The 17th century-set "Salem" is WGN America's first scripted series and hails from creators Brandon Braga ("24") and Adam Simon and studio Fox21 ("Homeland"). The network has ordered 13 episodes to premiere in 2014.

Xander Berkeley ("Nikita") has also joined the cast as a regular in the role of Magistrate Hale, one of Salem's selectmen.


20.50 | 0 komentar | Read More

Craig Ferguson to host syndicated game show

'Late Late Show" host Craig Ferguson is spreading his TV wings.

Starting next fall, Ferguson will host a syndicated half-hour game show called "Celebrity Name Game," developed by ex-"Friends" star Courteney Cox and her former husband, David Arquette.

The show, produced by FremantleMedia North America and Debmar-Mercury ("The Wendy Williams Show," "Family Feud"), will feature Ferguson teaming with celebrity contestants to identify famous names from all facets of life (including cartoon characters).

It's the second of Debmar-Mercury's game shows to feature a talk-show host; "Family Feud" is hosted by Steve Harvey, who also hosts the syndicated "Steve Harvey," now in its second season.

Ferguson, 51, has hosted "Late Late Show" on CBS since January 2005.


20.50 | 0 komentar | Read More

TV specials, promotions commemorate Kennedy death anniversary

The onslaught of TV specials and related events commemorating the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination (Nov. 22, 1963) will begin shortly — with Nat Geo first out of the gate.

The network is promoting its upcoming movie "Killing Kennedy" (starring Rob Lowe as JFK) with a '60s-style newsstand showcasing iconic magazine covers from 1957-63 encompassing both JFK and his assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. The newsstand — on display here next week — will also include front-page newspaper headlines from Nov. 23, 1963, the day after JFK's assassination in Dallas. The newsstand will be at Penn Station next Tuesday, Nov. 5, at Herald Square (Nov. 6) and at Columbus Circle (Nov. 7) — with people dressed in '60s-era garb passing out reproductions of the newspapers as well as real JFK half-dollar coins. "Killing Kennedy" premieres Nov. 10 (8 p.m.), with co-stars Will Rothhaar (Oswald), Ginnifer Goodwin (Jackie Kennedy) and Michelle Trachtenberg (Marina Oswald).

Belushi: Maybe this time?

Here: Don't know about you, but I'd file this one in the "just a wee bit disturbing" folder: 85-year-old Dr. Ruth Westheimer — better known as "Dr. Ruth" — is returning to the land of TV with a new talk show. Granted, "The Wisdom of Dr. Ruth Westheimer" will be only 15 minutes long (airing weekly) and granted, it will air on niche network Shalom TV (premiering Nov. 18), but still . . .

And there: Emile Hirsch, who's playing Clyde Barrow in A&E's upcoming miniseries "Bonnie & Clyde," has been cast as John Belushi in Steve Conrad's biopic of the hard-charging TV and movie star ("Saturday Night Live," "Animal House") who died in 1982 at the age of 33. Hopefully Hirsch, 28, will have better luck than a pre-"Commish"/"The Shield" star Michael Chiklis who, back in 1989, played Belushi in the big-screen stinker, "Wired," based on Bob Woodward's best-seller. That movie was pilloried by Belushi's widow, Judith; this one's based on her book, "Belushi: A Biography." So there.

Last, but not least . . .

Armand Assante will be at Sterling Gardens (Matawan, NJ) this Saturday for a dinner/cigar-sampling (Ora Vivo cigars). Call (732) 758-8126 for information . . . Ch. 4's Bruce Beck emcees Wednesday's President's Dinner (St. John's) at the Waldorf . . . Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" will include a tribute to Marcia Wallace, who died last Friday at 70 and played Edna Krabappel. She's best-known to older TV viewers as Carol, Bob Newhart's secretary on "The Bob Newhart Show" . . . John Gabriel is joined by his old pal Charles Grodin for a night of comedy and song Dec. 8 at The Metropolitan Room (West 22nd) . . . MSG "Halls of Fame" host Fran Healy at Flex Mussels Restaurant (82nd St.)


20.50 | 0 komentar | Read More

ABC apologizes for ‘Kill everyone in China’ remark on Kimmel

After more than a week of escalating criticism, ABC is apologizing for a segment of "Jimmy Kimmel Live" in which a child joked about killing Chinese people.

The network said the offensive skit will be edited out of the late-night talk show's episode for future airings or any other distribution, including online.

The controversy erupted after an Oct. 16 comedy bit in which Kimmel asked a "Kids Table" of youngsters to comment on recent news events, such as the federal government shutdown. At one point, Kimmel asked the kids what the United States should do to end its growing debt to China.

"America owes China a lot of money, $1.3 trillion," he said. "How should we pay them back?"

"Kill everyone in China!" a 6-year-old boy exclaimed.

Kimmel joked, "That's an interesting idea" and laughed.

Another panelist suggested, ironically, that China should be separated from the rest of the world by a large wall.

Later Kimmel asked the youngsters, "Should we allow the Chinese to live?" The four kids, aged 6 and 7, were divided.

A video excerpt of the skit quickly went viral and prompted bloggers to wonder why ABC was shrugging off an attempt at humor that might have annoyed one billion people.

The segment also triggered an online petition to President Obama demanding that ABC "cut the show" and issue a formal apology for the skit they said bore a resemblance to Nazi treatment of Jews.

"The kids might not know anything better," the petition said. "However, Jimmy Kimmel and ABC's management are adults. They had a choice not to air this racist program, which promotes racial hatred."

More than 60,000 people had signed the petition within nine days of its posting on the White House "We The People" Web site. The demand also called for an investigation of the show.

ABC responded in an Oct. 15 letter, disclosed Monday, to a group called 80-20 that identifies itself as a pan-Asian-American political organization.

"We're writing to offer our sincere apology," the letter began. It said the network "would never purposefully do anything to upset" the Chinese, Asian or other communities.

"Our objective is to entertain," the letter added.


20.50 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Dexter’ headed to Netflix

Netflix has struck a deal to begin streaming "Dexter," which ended its eight-season run on Showtime late last month.

Under the new deal with CBS Corp., the first four seasons of "Dexter" (Michael C. Hall) will be available on Netflix beginning this Thursday, Halloween.

Seasons 5-8 will be available on Neftlix beginning Jan. 1.

Hall earned a Golden Globe for his role as Dexter Morgan, a Miami forensics expert who moonlights as a serial killer.

The series premiered on Showtime in 2006.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Craig Ferguson to host syndicated game show

'Late Late Show" host Craig Ferguson is spreading his TV wings.

Starting next fall, Ferguson will host a syndicated half-hour game show called "Celebrity Name Game," developed by ex-"Friends" star Courteney Cox and her former husband, David Arquette.

The show, produced by FremantleMedia North America and Debmar-Mercury ("The Wendy Williams Show," "Family Feud"), will feature Ferguson teaming with celebrity contestants to identify famous names from all facets of life (including cartoon characters).

It's the second of Debmar-Mercury's game shows to feature a talk-show host; "Family Feud" is hosted by Steve Harvey, who also hosts the syndicated "Steve Harvey," now in its second season.

Ferguson, 51, has hosted "Late Late Show" on CBS since January 2005.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

‘Made in Jersey’ actress moves to ‘Salem’

Janet Montgomery has been cast as the lead in WGN America's upcoming drama series "Salem," about the Massachusetts town's infamous witch trials.

Montgomery, who toplined last fall's short-lived CBS drama "Made in Jersey," will play Mary Sibley, the ruthless yet vulnerable wife of one of the wealthy town selectmen.

The British actress previously co-starred in "Dancing on the Edge" (Starz), "Entourage" (HBO) and "Human Target" (Fox).

The 17th century-set "Salem" is WGN America's first scripted series and hails from creators Brandon Braga ("24") and Adam Simon and studio Fox21 ("Homeland"). The network has ordered 13 episodes to premiere in 2014.

Xander Berkeley ("Nikita") has also joined the cast as a regular in the role of Magistrate Hale, one of Salem's selectmen.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

TV specials, promotions commemorate Kennedy death anniversary

The onslaught of TV specials and related events commemorating the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination (Nov. 22, 1963) will begin shortly — with Nat Geo first out of the gate.

The network is promoting its upcoming movie "Killing Kennedy" (starring Rob Lowe as JFK) with a '60s-style newsstand showcasing iconic magazine covers from 1957-63 encompassing both JFK and his assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. The newsstand — on display here next week — will also include front-page newspaper headlines from Nov. 23, 1963, the day after JFK's assassination in Dallas. The newsstand will be at Penn Station next Tuesday, Nov. 5, at Herald Square (Nov. 6) and at Columbus Circle (Nov. 7) — with people dressed in '60s-era garb passing out reproductions of the newspapers as well as real JFK half-dollar coins. "Killing Kennedy" premieres Nov. 10 (8 p.m.), with co-stars Will Rothhaar (Oswald), Ginnifer Goodwin (Jackie Kennedy) and Michelle Trachtenberg (Marina Oswald).

Belushi: Maybe this time?

Here: Don't know about you, but I'd file this one in the "just a wee bit disturbing" folder: 85-year-old Dr. Ruth Westheimer — better known as "Dr. Ruth" — is returning to the land of TV with a new talk show. Granted, "The Wisdom of Dr. Ruth Westheimer" will be only 15 minutes long (airing weekly) and granted, it will air on niche network Shalom TV (premiering Nov. 18), but still . . .

And there: Emile Hirsch, who's playing Clyde Barrow in A&E's upcoming miniseries "Bonnie & Clyde," has been cast as John Belushi in Steve Conrad's biopic of the hard-charging TV and movie star ("Saturday Night Live," "Animal House") who died in 1982 at the age of 33. Hopefully Hirsch, 28, will have better luck than a pre-"Commish"/"The Shield" star Michael Chiklis who, back in 1989, played Belushi in the big-screen stinker, "Wired," based on Bob Woodward's best-seller. That movie was pilloried by Belushi's widow, Judith; this one's based on her book, "Belushi: A Biography." So there.

Last, but not least . . .

Armand Assante will be at Sterling Gardens (Matawan, NJ) this Saturday for a dinner/cigar-sampling (Ora Vivo cigars). Call (732) 758-8126 for information . . . Ch. 4's Bruce Beck emcees Wednesday's President's Dinner (St. John's) at the Waldorf . . . Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" will include a tribute to Marcia Wallace, who died last Friday at 70 and played Edna Krabappel. She's best-known to older TV viewers as Carol, Bob Newhart's secretary on "The Bob Newhart Show" . . . John Gabriel is joined by his old pal Charles Grodin for a night of comedy and song Dec. 8 at The Metropolitan Room (West 22nd) . . . MSG "Halls of Fame" host Fran Healy at Flex Mussels Restaurant (82nd St.)


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

ABC apologizes for ‘Kill everyone in China’ remark on Kimmel

After more than a week of escalating criticism, ABC is apologizing for a segment of "Jimmy Kimmel Live" in which a child joked about killing Chinese people.

The network said the offensive skit will be edited out of the late-night talk show's episode for future airings or any other distribution, including online.

The controversy erupted after an Oct. 16 comedy bit in which Kimmel asked a "Kids Table" of youngsters to comment on recent news events, such as the federal government shutdown. At one point, Kimmel asked the kids what the United States should do to end its growing debt to China.

"America owes China a lot of money, $1.3 trillion," he said. "How should we pay them back?"

"Kill everyone in China!" a 6-year-old boy exclaimed.

Kimmel joked, "That's an interesting idea" and laughed.

Another panelist suggested, ironically, that China should be separated from the rest of the world by a large wall.

Later Kimmel asked the youngsters, "Should we allow the Chinese to live?" The four kids, aged 6 and 7, were divided.

A video excerpt of the skit quickly went viral and prompted bloggers to wonder why ABC was shrugging off an attempt at humor that might have annoyed one billion people.

The segment also triggered an online petition to President Obama demanding that ABC "cut the show" and issue a formal apology for the skit they said bore a resemblance to Nazi treatment of Jews.

"The kids might not know anything better," the petition said. "However, Jimmy Kimmel and ABC's management are adults. They had a choice not to air this racist program, which promotes racial hatred."

More than 60,000 people had signed the petition within nine days of its posting on the White House "We The People" Web site. The demand also called for an investigation of the show.

ABC responded in an Oct. 15 letter, disclosed Monday, to a group called 80-20 that identifies itself as a pan-Asian-American political organization.

"We're writing to offer our sincere apology," the letter began. It said the network "would never purposefully do anything to upset" the Chinese, Asian or other communities.

"Our objective is to entertain," the letter added.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Hynes used government e-mail to discuss campaign: report

Written By kom nampuldu on Senin, 28 Oktober 2013 | 18.18

Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes used his government e-mail to chat with pals about campaign strategy against his political opponent, Ken Thompson, according to a report.

A half-dozen e-mails leaked to the Web site BuzzFeed include a reply apparently from former state Chief Justice Sol Wachtler that contains a racial slur.

Wachtler allegedly wrote the word "schwarze," a derogatory Yiddish term for African-Americans.

It wasn't clear why the term was used or whether it was aimed at Thompson, who is black.

Wachtler, who spent 13 months in prison in the 1990s for harassing his mistress, strongly denied sending the message.

"That is a fraudulent and libelous, and we are getting to the bottom of it now," Wachtler told The Post.

A spokesman for Hynes said the DA's staff was investigating the alleged Wachtler message and insisted Hynes never saw it. Spokesman Jerry Schmetterer said other e-mails may have been doctored as well.

He also downplayed the exchanges, saying they were simply "e-mails between friends."

"They have no role in the campaign," Schmetterer said. "They were just talking about what was going on in the primary."

It is a violation of campaign rules for a candidate to use public e-mails to run for office.

Among the e-mails was one in which Hynes gives his take on former Gov. Eliot Spitzer's run for city comptroller.

"Interesting. Spitzer might win," Hynes wrote.

After losing the Democratic primary to Thompson, Hynes, 78, is running in the general election on the Republican and Conservative Party lines.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Gomes’ blast leads Red Sox to Game 4 victory

ST. LOUIS — Jonny Gomes was guilty as charged of obstruction Sunday.

The Red Sox outfielder took one big swing in the sixth inning and effectively obstructed the Cardinals from running away with this World Series.

There would be zero controversy on this night, only a sigh of relief for the Red Sox that a sense of normalcy had returned with their 4-2 victory in Game 4 of the World Series before 47,469 at Busch Stadium.

Gomes' three-run homer against Seth Maness helped ensure the Series, now tied at 2-2, will return to Boston on Wednesday. First there is the matter of Monday's Game 5, with aces Jon Lester and Adam Wainwright set for a rematch from the opener.

A night after Will Middlebrooks was hit with a controversial obstruction call at third base that allowed Allen Craig to score the winning run in the ninth inning, order was restored. And the Red Sox got the big hit for which they had been searching in recent days.

Gomes, a late addition to the lineup after Shane Victorino was scratched because of lower-back tightness, slugged a 2-2 fastball from Maness into the visitors' bullpen in the sixth and trotted around the bases as if he were auditioning for a spot on "Dancing with the Stars."

"When they brought Maness in, I'm just a right-handed, hard-swinger guy," Gomes said. "I don't think there's too many matchups to stay away from. If I'm fortunate enough to get a mistake, the bat's going to come through the zone hot, and it worked out."

The Cardinals took their best shot at regaining control in the seventh. But after Matt Carpenter delivered an RBI single against Craig Breslow to pull the Cardinals within 4-2, the Red Sox turned to Junichi Tazawa, who retired Matt Holliday with the tying runs on base. After John Lackey pitched a scoreless eighth, Koji Uehara worked the ninth for the save. The right-hander picked off pinch-runner Kolten Wong at first base to end the game, leaving Carlos Beltran at the plate.

"This is consistent with the way we've responded to a tough night the night before," Red Sox manager John Farrell said. "We came in today fully expecting a very good game to be put together. That's just who these guys are, and they've shown it many times over."

David Ortiz continues to soar. The Red Sox slugger finished 3-for-3 with a walk and is 10-for-13 (.769) in the series.

Sloppy defense had contributed to the Red Sox losing the previous two games, but they survived two errors Sunday, one of which led to the Cardinals scoring an unearned run.

Lance Lynn surrendered three earned runs on three hits and three walks over 5 2/3 innings. With the score 1-1, the right-hander got two quick outs to begin the sixth, but never completed the inning. Dustin Pedroia singled before Ortiz walked on four pitches, and Lynn was removed for Maness, who surrendered the blast to Gomes.

"Seth has been a guy who has been able to help us out and do an incredible job in that situation all season long," Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. "He's been able to come in and get the big out when we needed it, and we just wanted to give him a shot. And it just didn't work out tonight."

Ortiz's double leading off the fifth led to the Red Sox tying the game at 1-1, but the damage could have been more severe for the Cardinals. Lynn walked Gomes and Xander Bogaerts to load the bases following Ortiz's double and Stephen Drew's sacrifice fly made it 1-1. But Lynn then struck out David Ross and retired pinch-hitter Mike Carp to end the threat.

Clay Buchholz, recently bothered by shoulder tightness, pitched four innings and allowed an unearned run on three hits with three walks and three strikeouts before he was removed for the pinch hitter in the fifth. A night earlier, the Red Sox received only four innings from starting pitcher Jake Peavy.

Beltran's RBI single gave the Cardinals an unearned run against Buchholz in the third. The RBI was Beltran's 14th this postseason and second in the World Series. Beltran also had an RBI single as part of the Cardinals' Game 2 victory at Fenway Park.

Carpenter singled to begin the rally and raced to second after Jacoby Ellsbury booted the ball. Beltran followed with the RBI single and Buchholz retired the next two batters to make the run unearned.

Lynn was dominant early, facing the minimum 12 batters through four innings. Ortiz singled off Lynn's left heel leading off the second, but was erased when Gomes hit into a double play.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Cardinals miss chance to bury Boston

ST. LOUIS — And the Cardinals trail this World Series, two games to two.

OK, that's of course not technically accurate. After the Red Sox prevailed in Sunday night's Game 4, 4-2 at Busch Stadium, we're actually, in the Fall Classic, guaranteed a return to Fenway Park for Game 6 Tuesday night. Furthermore, we've learned repeatedly over the last few years that it would be folly to declare this St. Louis club down for the count.

Nevertheless, the Cardinals, after failing to come through in clutch situations, making at least one questionable managerial decision and ending the game in hair-pulling fashion, have to be kicking themselves right now. As well as wondering where they would be if not for the grace of two horrible Red Sox throws from behind home plate over their third basemen's heads, which have led directly to the Cardinals' two victories this past week.

"We weren't able to put together a good rally," Carlos Beltran said. "… We just couldn't put anything together."

When the Cardinals prevailed in Game 3, 5-4 thanks to the correct obstruction call on Red Sox third baseman Will Middlebrooks (which resulted from one of those poor throws to third, this one by Jarrod Saltalamacchia), the Red Sox looked to be in serious trouble. The Cards had a chance to wrap this up at home with two more victories, and Boston desperately needed a solid outing from its ailing right-hander Clay Buchholz who has been battling shoulder tightness.

Instead, Buchholz, despite throwing the ball with diminished velocity — his fastball hovered in the high 80s, rather than the standard 91 or 92 mph range — hung in there for four innings, allowing just one run and stranding five Cardinals baserunners. Left-hander Felix Doubront, who contributed two shutout innings on Saturday night, came right back and delivered another 2²/₃ solid innings, allowing just one run. Doubront became the winner when feisty yet slumping Red Sox outfielder Jonny Gomes crushed a sixth-inning, three-run homer over the left-field wall, against just-inserted reliever Seth Maness, to break a 1-1 tie and get Boston right back into this Series.

So the Red Sox have regained the home-field advantage and go with their ace, Jon Lester, against Cardinals ace, Adam Wainwright, in Monday night's Game 5 at Busch. This represents a rematch of Game 1 at Fenway Park, in which Lester and the Red Sox dominated Wainwright and the Cardinals, 8-1.

For sure, the Red Sox no longer look like surprise finalists whose tanks are running low. And the Cardinals no longer appear to be a dynasty getting ready for the next parade.

"We didn't have a lot of movement," Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. "We didn't get a lot going, and didn't have any momentum offensively."

As Buchholz, who seemed like a crisis waiting to happen, hung around to keep the Red Sox in the game, Boston knotted the score at 1-1 in the fifth. When Dustin Pedroia lined a two-out single to left-center field in the sixth inning, Matheny kept his starter, Lance Lynn, in the game to face David Ortiz. Even though the ridiculously dangerous Ortiz already had a single and double on the day, and even though Cardinals lefty specialist Randy Choate was warming up in the bullpen.

Choate was ready, Matheny confirmed, and added, "We just weren't going there." Ortiz hit a single off Choate in Game 3.

So Lynn threw around Ortiz, walking him, and then Matheny went to Maness to pitch to Gomes, who entered the at-bat 0-for-9 with a walk in this Series.

"With Seth, he's been a guy who's been able to help us out and do an incredible job in that situation all season long," Matheny said. "He's been able to come in and get the big out when we needed it, and we wanted to give him a shot. And it just didn't work out tonight."

At 2-and-2, Maness said, he wanted to pitch a fastball away. Instead, he explained: "Fastball down the middle up. Wasn't the spot I was looking for."

Gomes delivered his homer, and the entire tenor of the series changed. And when pinch-hitter Allen Craig blasted a long single with one out in the ninth and Matt Carpenter popped out to second base, the game was up to Beltran, exactly the guy the Cardinals would want up. Except that Red Sox closer Koji Uehara picked Craig's pinch-runner Kolten Wong off first base, giving this series the second straight wacky last play.

"I knew I was dead once I went to plant and push off, and I felt nothing go," Wong told reporters. "My foot slipped out and I was done.''

Photo: Gifdsports

"We talk very clearly about a very good pick-off move," Matheny said. "He was reminded once he got on base, and also he was reminded that run didn't mean much. 'Be careful. Shorten up.' "

The Cardinals have slipped, for sure. Are they done? Not yet. Yet they have made their task considerably harder than it could have been.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

City’s final fleet of Crown Victoria taxis destroyed by Sandy

Hurricane Sandy destroyed everything in her path — including dozens of the city's last new Crown Victoria cabs.

Scores of the new cabs were ruined by floodwaters as the vehicles sat in a Hoboken, NJ, lot awaiting shipment to a Manhattan dealership.

The new cabs would have been some of the last of the iconic model, which Ford stopped producing in 2011.

Two hundred of the vehicles in the lot were lost in the storm.

"When I first started seeing the pictures, I was on vacation in the Dominican Republic," said Ralph Sibbio, 50, head of Manhattan Ford's taxi division. "That one photo sums it all up . . . and it's all you needed to know."

Sibbio said that in addition to the Crown Victorias, the dealership lost 75 other cabs — totaling $4 million in losses.

"It was devastating to see," he said. "It really was a tragedy."

Although the insurance company paid Manhattan Ford for the cabs, Sibbio said, the company still took a major loss given its deductible. He added that cab owners suffered as well.

"It was devastating to us, not only financially, but to clients," he said, noting that the car was popular because it rarely broke down.

"They wanted the last of the stronghold of the Crown Victoria, the car that can handle the mean streets of New York City."

Taxi and Limousine Commission chief David Yassky said the photo of the flooded cabs captured much of the suffering throughout the industry. Many owners lost their cars and suffered through a gas shortage.

"The photo became emblematic of the storm in general, but it really illustrated the impact on [the industry],'' Yassky said.

Richard Wissak, who co-owns the 55 Stan Garage in Long Island City, said his family taxi business struggled after the storm.

The company lost 28 cabs entirely and dozens more were damaged as saltwater corroded their engines. He watched it through their surveillance cameras.

"We saw through the cameras the water rising and rising, and then at a certain level, it all went black," he said.

"We have hundreds of drivers that rely on this job to feed their families. To come to work and not be able to go work was frustrating for them, and for me."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Mayoral debate rescheduled to avoid Sandy anniversary

Mayoral debate rescheduled to avoid Sandy anniversary | New York Post
  • Sign in / Register
  • or email tips@nypost.com

By Beth DeFalco

October 28, 2013 | 12:41am

The Campaign Finance Board has postponed Tuesday's planned mayoral debate until Wednesday so it won't conflict with the anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.

Democrat Bill de Blasio and Republican Joe Lhota put out an unusual joint statement asking for the move, saying Tuesday "should be marked with solemn reflection."

The 90-minute debate will air at 7 p.m. on WNBC/Channel 4.

With your existing account from...

{* loginWidget *}

With a traditional account...

{* #userInformationForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* traditionalSignIn_password *}

{* traditionalSignIn_signInButton *}{* traditionalSignIn_createButton *}

{* /userInformationForm *}

Welcome Back, {* welcomeName *}

{* loginWidget *}

Welcome back!

{* welcomeName *}

{* #userInformationForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* traditionalSignIn_password *}

{* traditionalSignIn_signInButton *}

{* /userInformationForm *}

{* #registrationForm *} {* traditionalRegistration_emailAddress *} {* traditionalRegistration_password *} {* traditionalRegistration_passwordConfirm *} {* traditionalRegistration_displayName *} {* traditionalRegistration_captcha *} {* traditionalRegistration_ageVerification *} By clicking "Create Account", you confirm that you accept our

terms of service

and have read and understand

privacy policy

.

{* /registrationForm *}

Don't worry, it happens. We'll send you a link to create a new password.

{* #forgotPasswordForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *}

{* /forgotPasswordForm *}

We've sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has not been changed.

{* mergeAccounts *}

{* #tradAuthenticateMergeForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* mergePassword *}

{* /tradAuthenticateMergeForm *}


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Ray Kelly apologizes to father of missing boy

Written By kom nampuldu on Minggu, 27 Oktober 2013 | 20.49

Police Commissioner Ray Kelly paid a visit Saturday to the father of Avonte Oquendo and expressed regret for saying he feared the missing 14-year-old autistic boy was dead.

"He was very nice to me,'' Daniel Oquendo told The Post. "He apologized.''

Kelly assured the family the search would continue for Avonte, who walked out of his Long Island City, Queens, school more than three weeks ago and hasn't been seen since.

On Thursday, Kelly told WABC/Channel 7: "Unfortunately, we are not hopeful that we're going to find this young man alive, but we are continuing our search.''

The pessimistic comment infuriated the boy's family, prompting the commissioner's visit.

In an interview with WPIX/Channel 11 after he met with Kelly, the dad described the commissioner as a "stand-up guy.''


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Photog’s signed celebrity Polaroids for sale

He always got the big pictures — and the little ones.

But now photographer Tim Boxer is letting them all go, auctioning off his cherished collection of 212 autographed Polaroids of the hottest celebrities from the '70s and '80s.

For work, Boxer would snap every imaginable celeb — Meryl Streep, Henry Kissinger, Brooke Shields, Sean Connery and Robert De Niro, to name a few — with his Nikon F.

When he was done getting the professional-quality shot, he'd bring out his Polaroid SX-80 instant camera — which provided the immediate gratification of producing a developed photograph.

But he'd take the ritual one step further than Warhol, who was also known to snap Polaroids of stars.

"I'd ask them to autograph the pictures — no one else did that," Boxer said. "I thought it was more personal."

Brooke Shields, April 26, 1978. The 12-year-old actress was being interviewed by Post gossip columnist Earl Wilson at Mont St. Michel restaurant on West 57th Street. She was starring in the movie "Tilt," in which she played a wholesome pinball whiz—following her role as the daughter of a prostitute in "Pretty Baby."

He was never turned down. The closest he came to rejection was being threatened by the famously pugnacious scribe Norman Mailer, who took exception to Boxer's Nikon. "He didn't like the flash," said Boxer, who got his start in journalism in 1960 as a police reporter in Chicago. "He said, 'If you ever take a picture of me with your flash again, I'll have the boys after you.' "

The entire collection is estimated to fetch $20,000 to $30,000 and will be auctioned by Doyle New York on Nov. 25.

Jaqueline Onassis, Nov. 3, 1976. Gallagher's Steak House, where she was attending a pre-rehearsal party for the Josephine Baker tribute at the Metropolitan Opera House.

Andy Warhol, June 25, 1981. Eastern Airlines Flight No. 572, Atlanta to NYC, following the previous day's opening of the Limelight disco—where a live tiger prowled under a translucent dance floor.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Bloomberg falls short on public restrooms

Mayor Bloomberg has two months to get his legacy out of the toilet.

Hizzoner can brag about Manhattan's beautiful High Line and the gleaming new ballparks in The Bronx and Queens once his 12-year tenure ends, but at least one mission remains incomplete: installing 20 public restrooms throughout the city.

So far, only three loos have been plumbed since Bloomberg boldly announced in September 2005 that he'd install 20 throughout the city.

Potty users pay 25 cents per visit and are located at Madison Square Park in Manhattan, Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn and ­Corona Plaza in Queens.

"Toilets are really important. We all need them," said Shawn Shafner, founder of the POOP Project, a public toilet-advocacy group. "There's a dearth of them in the city."

The city Department of Transportation, which is overseeing the project, has a 20-year contract with the Spanish company Cemusa to install the toilets but is in no rush to get them all up and flushing.

Construction comes at no cost to the city, but in return Cemusa gets to sell advertising space on the structures' walls.

"DOT is committed to ­siting these amenities only where they're technically feasible, appropriate for the area and supported by the community," said Nicholas Mosquera, an agency spokesman.
"There is no set installation schedule."

But some New Yorkers want more.

"People will resort to what they've been doing — going in the corners," Keyon Jones, of Brooklyn, groused while walking by the Madison Square Park loo.The Department of Transportation is now reviewing potential locations on 125th and 175th streets in Manhattan, Williamsburg Plaza in Brooklyn and Fordham Plaza in the Bronx, Mosquera said. Construction on a toilet at Cadman Plaza in downtown Brooklyn is slated for early next year.

Carol McCreary, who co-founded PHLUSH, a public toilet advocacy group, said she avoids visiting New York because finding relief is such a hassle.

"I'm an active person. I have a disabled husband," said McCreary, who lives in Portland, Oregon. "We need restrooms."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Mike Tyson reveals drug, sex addictions in memoir

By the time he was 22 years old, Brooklyn born Mike Tyson was a worldwide phenomenon. A pro fighter since the age of 18, he had won his all but two of his first 28 fights by knockout or technical knockout — and in 16 of those fights, he had crushed his opponents in the first round.

When he was 20, he became the youngest heavyweight champion ever, and at 21 was the first to possess the sport's three major belts at once, making him the undisputed champion of the world.

When Tyson knocked out the legendary fighters Larry Holmes and Michael Spinks in 1988, he became the most athletically and culturally electrifying boxer since Muhammad Ali. Yet Tyson's personal life has been a decades long series of spectacular flame outs, detailed in his forthcoming memoir, "Undisputed Truth" (Blue Rider Press).

'I PUT GUYS IN COMAS'

Tyson was already partying hard and dating both Naomi Campbell and Miss America runner-up Suzette Charles, plus having sex with dozens of women a week when, at 21 years old, he met actress Robin Givens.

It was 1987. He had first seen her on a broadcast of "Soul Train" and asked his agent to set up a meeting in LA. Givens was waiting with her mother and her publicist.

"I should have known something was up," Tyson writes. "I . . . didn't know that Robin and her mother, Ruth, had been on the prowl for a big black celebrity for Robin since she graduated college."

Tyson fell hard, and he couldn't believe this beautiful, sophisticated woman wanted him. He had grown up in abject poverty in Brownsville. He never knew his father, and his mother, who died when he was 16, ran a brothel out of their apartment. His beloved trainer and surrogate father, Cus D'Amato, died two years earlier, in 1985.

Tyson was a high-school dropout with a lisp and a near-lethal case of low self-esteem. "My social skills consisted of putting a guy in a coma," he writes. "So maybe Robin was just what the doctor ordered."

On Feb. 7, 1988, 11 months after their first date, Tyson and Givens were married — only, Tyson writes, because she had told a mutual friend she was pregnant. There was no prenup. He quickly realized he had made a mistake.

"Right away, Ruth started talking about finding a suitable mansion for us to live in," Tyson writes.

While he was attending a close friend's funeral in LA, Tyson got a call from his account executive, who said Givens and her mother — whom Tyson calls "Ruthless" — were in his offices, demanding $5 million to buy an estate in New Jersey. He advised Tyson not to release the funds. "I listened," Tyson writes, "and then told him to give them the money. I was in love."

Not long after, Tyson says, he moved another $10 million into a separate account for Givens and her mother, and not long after, Givens told Tyson she had had a miscarriage. Tyson didn't buy it. "She was supposedly three months pregnant when we got married," he writes. "Now it was June and she hadn't gained a pound, so the next thing I knew she was in bed and claimed she had miscarried our baby."

But that, he says, wasn't her greatest betrayal. The same year they were married, Tyson and Givens sat down with Barbara Walters. It was, Tyson writes, spur of the moment: As the crew was loading up their gear, Givens — who wasn't supposed to be part of Tyson's profile — "pulled Barbara aside and told her that she still didn't have the truth. I guess Robin knew that Barbara would take the bait."

It went down as one of the most bizarre celebrity interviews ever. Tyson, three times the size of his wife, looked like he had been hit by a tranquilizer dart as Givens detailed the horror of their life together. "I think that there is a time when he cannot control his temper, and that is frightening to me," she said. "He shakes, he pushes, he swings . . . just recently I have become afraid. I mean very, very much afraid."

Soon after, Givens filed for divorce — "but that didn't stop us from seeing each other," Tyson writes. He'd often go by her house when he was in LA and was stunned to see her pull up one day with a blond man in the passenger seat. It was Brad Pitt.

"You had to see the look on his face," Tyson writes. "He looked like he was ready to receive his last rites. He also looked stoned out of his gourd."

Pitt begged Tyson, "Dude, don't strike me, don't strike me."

Tyson left, and the divorce was finalized on Valentine's Day 1989. He never had any real contact with Givens again.

'BLACKBALLED'

One year later, Mike Tyson was completely unraveling. He was 30 pounds overweight and had lost all interest in boxing — by his own admission, all he wanted to do was party.

In January 1990, he fought pathetically against Buster Douglas, an opponent he underestimated, and lost his title as heavyweight champion of the world. He was so delusional that he remembers thinking that "I had become so big that God was jealous of me."

By now, the famously crooked boxing promoter Don King had worked his way into Tyson's life, and that same year, Tyson learned that King owed him $2 million. "My assets totaled $15 million," Tyson writes, "but with all my purses I should have had a lot more."

Tyson knew King couldn't be trusted — "Everybody blackballed me once I got involved with him" — but was so self-loathing and self-destructive he kept King on the payroll.

Tyson was also undermining his training regimen. "I was out of control," he writes, "drinking, gorging on food, f- -king women." His friends were tasked with rounding up girls for orgies. Tyson's promiscuity caught up with him in July 1991, when a beauty-pageant contestant named Desiree Washington accused him of raping her in a hotel room in Indianapolis.

Tyson has always maintained the sex was consensual, but in February 1992, he was convicted of rape and sentenced to six years in prison. He figured he'd be out in three, and he was right.

"It was hard to maintain my ­humanity in a place like that," he writes. "I saw things that I couldn't understand one human being doing to another. I watched people get cut fighting over a cigarette. Somebody might throw some gasoline in another man's cell and try to light it and burn him up. Or somebody would grab a lady guard and throw her in the bathroom and rape her."

He began asking to be placed in "the hole" — solitary confinement, locked up 23 hours a day, the light always on — just for some peace of mind. He read voraciously: Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Shakespeare. He converted to ­Islam and did a jailhouse interview with Larry King.

John F. Kennedy Jr. flew in for a visit. Kennedy was a fan, and there were reports he wanted a post-jailhouse interview with ­Tyson for his floundering magazine, George.

"He was such a beautiful, down-to-earth cat," Tyson writes. They talked about Kennedy's cousin Michael, who had been having an affair with the family's teenage baby sitter. JFK Jr. also told Tyson he didn't know that much about his grandfather, except that the patriarch had coddled his sons so they'd run for office. "Nobody in my family knows how to run a business, that's why they all went into politics," Kennedy told him. "He wanted us to be pampered guys."

They also talked about relationships, and JFK Jr. mentioned other women. "I got a sense he was going through a lot of s- -t with his wife," Tyson writes. As the visit wound down, Tyson asked if Kennedy would reach out to his cousin Kathleen, the lieutenant governor of Maryland, to help expedite his release date.

"Mike," he said, "I don't really know her."

"You don't know her?" Tyson said. "What the f- -k do you mean? You all play football together up there in Hyannis Port."

JFK Jr. smiled, then was off.

'I WANTED TO DIE'

By November 2005, the former undisputed heavyweight champion of the world was a disgraced fighter, most notorious for having bitten off a chunk of Evander Holyfield's ear during a 1997 fight. It got him banned from boxing for one year. Tyson was broke, having squandered at least $100 million. At the grocery store, he'd do the math in his head and pull items out of the cart — one of his greatest fears was not being able to pay the bill at the register.

"The last time I remember doing that," he says, "was when my mother was on welfare."

Tyson was so promiscuous, he'd pick up any woman around, including, once, a 50-something cashier at Kmart. He was petrified that he had AIDS, yet he was sleeping at strip clubs and having unprotected sex with hookers. His diet at the time consisted of Hennessy, Cialis, cocaine — which he carried in bricks — Zoloft, pot, Marlboros and morphine.

Naomi Campbell attempted to intervene. "Mike, the word is out you're doing a lot of blow," she told him. "You need to stop. You're f- -king your life up."

Tyson's therapist finally persuaded him to check into rehab, but it wasn't till his third attempt that he began a true withdrawal from drugs.

The pain, he writes, was worse than anything he experienced in the ring. "The coke and the liquor were like Novocain for me. Once I stopped doing that, all my arthritis came roaring back. I was a cripple. I couldn't walk, my feet hurt so bad . . . I just wanted to die," he writes.

He was also sent to a sex therapist. At first, Tyson writes, he was skeptical, even though "at one point, everything I did sexually consisted of orgies." He always knew these experiences were empty — "It makes you feel like s- -t" — but now he was curious as to why he couldn't stop.

"It sounds trite," he writes, "but I was probably looking for someone to mother me. My whole life I was looking for love from my mother. My mother never gave love to a man. She gave them headaches, she scalded them, she stabbed them."

In rehab, he watched "La Vie en Rose," the French film about the troubled chanteuse Edith Piaf, and sobbed hysterically. Piaf, too, had been raised among hookers and pimps and never wanted to leave, and Tyson got that.

"You could be in hell and happy there," he writes. "Some people thrive in misery. You take away their misery and bring them into the light and they die emotionally and spiritually because pain and suffering has been their only comfort. The thought of someone loving them and helping them without wanting anything in return could never enter their minds."

Tyson would do several more stints in rehab — each time he relapsed, he'd call it "letting the devil in." He had a cultural resurgence in 2009, playing himself in "The Hangover." He now admits that he was drunk and high during the entire shoot. But he won strong reviews, and, encouraged, "my vanity kick[ed] in," he writes.

He was 380 pounds. Tyson went all vegan and began working out for three hours a day. His chronic ailments disappeared.

Oprah called. He went on her show and talked about the monumental losses he had suffered — including the accidental death of his 4-year-old daughter, who had been living with her mother at the time — and his remorse over the Holyfield incident. The response was overwhelmingly positive.

"When I look back on my life, it's hard to believe how big an entity I was at the height of my fame," Tyson writes. "I felt like I was part of a freak show for most of my career as a boxer. Later, I just felt like a freak."

Now 47 years old, he still hopes for a happy ending, but he knows he may never get there.

"I still have a lot of work to do," he writes. "I have to try to really love myself."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Woman slain, 5 hurt in New Haven nightclub shooting

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — One woman was killed and five people were injured at a New Haven nightclub early Saturday.

Gunfire rang out inside the Key Club Cabaret at 3:30 a.m., and more than 100 patrons fled through the main doorway, police said.

Erica Robinson, 26, of West ­Haven, died and Jahad Brumsey, 29, of West Haven, was critically injured, police said. Four others, ages 19 to 34, were treated for injuries that were not considered life-threatening.

No suspect has been identified. Police have been interviewing several witnesses.

The interior of the club was littered with drug paraphernalia and smelled of marijuana, police said.

Gov. Dannel Malloy and Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman issued a statement saying, "Connecticut cities still suffer too often from the plague of gun violence."


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Mike Tyson reveals drug, sex addictions in memoir

By the time he was 22 years old, Brooklyn born Mike Tyson was a worldwide phenomenon. A pro fighter since the age of 18, he had won his all but two of his first 28 fights by knockout or technical knockout — and in 16 of those fights, he had crushed his opponents in the first round.

When he was 20, he became the youngest heavyweight champion ever, and at 21 was the first to possess the sport's three major belts at once, making him the undisputed champion of the world.

When Tyson knocked out the legendary fighters Larry Holmes and Michael Spinks in 1988, he became the most athletically and culturally electrifying boxer since Muhammad Ali. Yet Tyson's personal life has been a decades long series of spectacular flame outs, detailed in his forthcoming memoir, "Undisputed Truth" (Blue Rider Press).

'I PUT GUYS IN COMAS'

Tyson was already partying hard and dating both Naomi Campbell and Miss America runner-up Suzette Charles, plus having sex with dozens of women a week when, at 21 years old, he met actress Robin Givens.

It was 1987. He had first seen her on a broadcast of "Soul Train" and asked his agent to set up a meeting in LA. Givens was waiting with her mother and her publicist.

"I should have known something was up," Tyson writes. "I . . . didn't know that Robin and her mother, Ruth, had been on the prowl for a big black celebrity for Robin since she graduated college."

Tyson fell hard, and he couldn't believe this beautiful, sophisticated woman wanted him. He had grown up in abject poverty in Brownsville. He never knew his father, and his mother, who died when he was 16, ran a brothel out of their apartment. His beloved trainer and surrogate father, Cus D'Amato, died two years earlier, in 1985.

Tyson was a high-school dropout with a lisp and a near-lethal case of low self-esteem. "My social skills consisted of putting a guy in a coma," he writes. "So maybe Robin was just what the doctor ordered."

On Feb. 7, 1988, 11 months after their first date, Tyson and Givens were married — only, Tyson writes, because she had told a mutual friend she was pregnant. There was no prenup. He quickly realized he had made a mistake.

"Right away, Ruth started talking about finding a suitable mansion for us to live in," Tyson writes.

While he was attending a close friend's funeral in LA, Tyson got a call from his account executive, who said Givens and her mother — whom Tyson calls "Ruthless" — were in his offices, demanding $5 million to buy an estate in New Jersey. He advised Tyson not to release the funds. "I listened," Tyson writes, "and then told him to give them the money. I was in love."

Not long after, Tyson says, he moved another $10 million into a separate account for Givens and her mother, and not long after, Givens told Tyson she had had a miscarriage. Tyson didn't buy it. "She was supposedly three months pregnant when we got married," he writes. "Now it was June and she hadn't gained a pound, so the next thing I knew she was in bed and claimed she had miscarried our baby."

But that, he says, wasn't her greatest betrayal. The same year they were married, Tyson and Givens sat down with Barbara Walters. It was, Tyson writes, spur of the moment: As the crew was loading up their gear, Givens — who wasn't supposed to be part of Tyson's profile — "pulled Barbara aside and told her that she still didn't have the truth. I guess Robin knew that Barbara would take the bait."

It went down as one of the most bizarre celebrity interviews ever. Tyson, three times the size of his wife, looked like he had been hit by a tranquilizer dart as Givens detailed the horror of their life together. "I think that there is a time when he cannot control his temper, and that is frightening to me," she said. "He shakes, he pushes, he swings . . . just recently I have become afraid. I mean very, very much afraid."

Soon after, Givens filed for divorce — "but that didn't stop us from seeing each other," Tyson writes. He'd often go by her house when he was in LA and was stunned to see her pull up one day with a blond man in the passenger seat. It was Brad Pitt.

"You had to see the look on his face," Tyson writes. "He looked like he was ready to receive his last rites. He also looked stoned out of his gourd."

Pitt begged Tyson, "Dude, don't strike me, don't strike me."

Tyson left, and the divorce was finalized on Valentine's Day 1989. He never had any real contact with Givens again.

'BLACKBALLED'

One year later, Mike Tyson was completely unraveling. He was 30 pounds overweight and had lost all interest in boxing — by his own admission, all he wanted to do was party.

In January 1990, he fought pathetically against Buster Douglas, an opponent he underestimated, and lost his title as heavyweight champion of the world. He was so delusional that he remembers thinking that "I had become so big that God was jealous of me."

By now, the famously crooked boxing promoter Don King had worked his way into Tyson's life, and that same year, Tyson learned that King owed him $2 million. "My assets totaled $15 million," Tyson writes, "but with all my purses I should have had a lot more."

Tyson knew King couldn't be trusted — "Everybody blackballed me once I got involved with him" — but was so self-loathing and self-destructive he kept King on the payroll.

Tyson was also undermining his training regimen. "I was out of control," he writes, "drinking, gorging on food, f- -king women." His friends were tasked with rounding up girls for orgies. Tyson's promiscuity caught up with him in July 1991, when a beauty-pageant contestant named Desiree Washington accused him of raping her in a hotel room in Indianapolis.

Tyson has always maintained the sex was consensual, but in February 1992, he was convicted of rape and sentenced to six years in prison. He figured he'd be out in three, and he was right.

"It was hard to maintain my ­humanity in a place like that," he writes. "I saw things that I couldn't understand one human being doing to another. I watched people get cut fighting over a cigarette. Somebody might throw some gasoline in another man's cell and try to light it and burn him up. Or somebody would grab a lady guard and throw her in the bathroom and rape her."

He began asking to be placed in "the hole" — solitary confinement, locked up 23 hours a day, the light always on — just for some peace of mind. He read voraciously: Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Shakespeare. He converted to ­Islam and did a jailhouse interview with Larry King.

John F. Kennedy Jr. flew in for a visit. Kennedy was a fan, and there were reports he wanted a post-jailhouse interview with ­Tyson for his floundering magazine, George.

"He was such a beautiful, down-to-earth cat," Tyson writes. They talked about Kennedy's cousin Michael, who had been having an affair with the family's teenage baby sitter. JFK Jr. also told Tyson he didn't know that much about his grandfather, except that the patriarch had coddled his sons so they'd run for office. "Nobody in my family knows how to run a business, that's why they all went into politics," Kennedy told him. "He wanted us to be pampered guys."

They also talked about relationships, and JFK Jr. mentioned other women. "I got a sense he was going through a lot of s- -t with his wife," Tyson writes. As the visit wound down, Tyson asked if Kennedy would reach out to his cousin Kathleen, the lieutenant governor of Maryland, to help expedite his release date.

"Mike," he said, "I don't really know her."

"You don't know her?" Tyson said. "What the f- -k do you mean? You all play football together up there in Hyannis Port."

JFK Jr. smiled, then was off.

'I WANTED TO DIE'

By November 2005, the former undisputed heavyweight champion of the world was a disgraced fighter, most notorious for having bitten off a chunk of Evander Holyfield's ear during a 1997 fight. It got him banned from boxing for one year. Tyson was broke, having squandered at least $100 million. At the grocery store, he'd do the math in his head and pull items out of the cart — one of his greatest fears was not being able to pay the bill at the register.

"The last time I remember doing that," he says, "was when my mother was on welfare."

Tyson was so promiscuous, he'd pick up any woman around, including, once, a 50-something cashier at Kmart. He was petrified that he had AIDS, yet he was sleeping at strip clubs and having unprotected sex with hookers. His diet at the time consisted of Hennessy, Cialis, cocaine — which he carried in bricks — Zoloft, pot, Marlboros and morphine.

Naomi Campbell attempted to intervene. "Mike, the word is out you're doing a lot of blow," she told him. "You need to stop. You're f- -king your life up."

Tyson's therapist finally persuaded him to check into rehab, but it wasn't till his third attempt that he began a true withdrawal from drugs.

The pain, he writes, was worse than anything he experienced in the ring. "The coke and the liquor were like Novocain for me. Once I stopped doing that, all my arthritis came roaring back. I was a cripple. I couldn't walk, my feet hurt so bad . . . I just wanted to die," he writes.

He was also sent to a sex therapist. At first, Tyson writes, he was skeptical, even though "at one point, everything I did sexually consisted of orgies." He always knew these experiences were empty — "It makes you feel like s- -t" — but now he was curious as to why he couldn't stop.

"It sounds trite," he writes, "but I was probably looking for someone to mother me. My whole life I was looking for love from my mother. My mother never gave love to a man. She gave them headaches, she scalded them, she stabbed them."

In rehab, he watched "La Vie en Rose," the French film about the troubled chanteuse Edith Piaf, and sobbed hysterically. Piaf, too, had been raised among hookers and pimps and never wanted to leave, and Tyson got that.

"You could be in hell and happy there," he writes. "Some people thrive in misery. You take away their misery and bring them into the light and they die emotionally and spiritually because pain and suffering has been their only comfort. The thought of someone loving them and helping them without wanting anything in return could never enter their minds."

Tyson would do several more stints in rehab — each time he relapsed, he'd call it "letting the devil in." He had a cultural resurgence in 2009, playing himself in "The Hangover." He now admits that he was drunk and high during the entire shoot. But he won strong reviews, and, encouraged, "my vanity kick[ed] in," he writes.

He was 380 pounds. Tyson went all vegan and began working out for three hours a day. His chronic ailments disappeared.

Oprah called. He went on her show and talked about the monumental losses he had suffered — including the accidental death of his 4-year-old daughter, who had been living with her mother at the time — and his remorse over the Holyfield incident. The response was overwhelmingly positive.

"When I look back on my life, it's hard to believe how big an entity I was at the height of my fame," Tyson writes. "I felt like I was part of a freak show for most of my career as a boxer. Later, I just felt like a freak."

Now 47 years old, he still hopes for a happy ending, but he knows he may never get there.

"I still have a lot of work to do," he writes. "I have to try to really love myself."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Photog’s signed celebrity Polaroids for sale

He always got the big pictures — and the little ones.

But now photographer Tim Boxer is letting them all go, auctioning off his cherished collection of 212 autographed Polaroids of the hottest celebrities from the '70s and '80s.

For work, Boxer would snap every imaginable celeb — Meryl Streep, Henry Kissinger, Brooke Shields, Sean Connery and Robert De Niro, to name a few — with his Nikon F.

When he was done getting the professional-quality shot, he'd bring out his Polaroid SX-80 instant camera — which provided the immediate gratification of producing a developed photograph.

But he'd take the ritual one step further than Warhol, who was also known to snap Polaroids of stars.

"I'd ask them to autograph the pictures — no one else did that," Boxer said. "I thought it was more personal."

Brooke Shields, April 26, 1978. The 12-year-old actress was being interviewed by Post gossip columnist Earl Wilson at Mont St. Michel restaurant on West 57th Street. She was starring in the movie "Tilt," in which she played a wholesome pinball whiz—following her role as the daughter of a prostitute in "Pretty Baby."

He was never turned down. The closest he came to rejection was being threatened by the famously pugnacious scribe Norman Mailer, who took exception to Boxer's Nikon. "He didn't like the flash," said Boxer, who got his start in journalism in 1960 as a police reporter in Chicago. "He said, 'If you ever take a picture of me with your flash again, I'll have the boys after you.' "

The entire collection is estimated to fetch $20,000 to $30,000 and will be auctioned by Doyle New York on Nov. 25.

Jaqueline Onassis, Nov. 3, 1976. Gallagher's Steak House, where she was attending a pre-rehearsal party for the Josephine Baker tribute at the Metropolitan Opera House.

Andy Warhol, June 25, 1981. Eastern Airlines Flight No. 572, Atlanta to NYC, following the previous day's opening of the Limelight disco—where a live tiger prowled under a translucent dance floor.


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Bloomberg falls short on public restrooms

Mayor Bloomberg has two months to get his legacy out of the toilet.

Hizzoner can brag about Manhattan's beautiful High Line and the gleaming new ballparks in The Bronx and Queens once his 12-year tenure ends, but at least one mission remains incomplete: installing 20 public restrooms throughout the city.

So far, only three loos have been plumbed since Bloomberg boldly announced in September 2005 that he'd install 20 throughout the city.

Potty users pay 25 cents per visit and are located at Madison Square Park in Manhattan, Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn and ­Corona Plaza in Queens.

"Toilets are really important. We all need them," said Shawn Shafner, founder of the POOP Project, a public toilet-advocacy group. "There's a dearth of them in the city."

The city Department of Transportation, which is overseeing the project, has a 20-year contract with the Spanish company Cemusa to install the toilets but is in no rush to get them all up and flushing.

Construction comes at no cost to the city, but in return Cemusa gets to sell advertising space on the structures' walls.

"DOT is committed to ­siting these amenities only where they're technically feasible, appropriate for the area and supported by the community," said Nicholas Mosquera, an agency spokesman.
"There is no set installation schedule."

But some New Yorkers want more.

"People will resort to what they've been doing — going in the corners," Keyon Jones, of Brooklyn, groused while walking by the Madison Square Park loo.The Department of Transportation is now reviewing potential locations on 125th and 175th streets in Manhattan, Williamsburg Plaza in Brooklyn and Fordham Plaza in the Bronx, Mosquera said. Construction on a toilet at Cadman Plaza in downtown Brooklyn is slated for early next year.

Carol McCreary, who co-founded PHLUSH, a public toilet advocacy group, said she avoids visiting New York because finding relief is such a hassle.

"I'm an active person. I have a disabled husband," said McCreary, who lives in Portland, Oregon. "We need restrooms."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Ray Kelly apologizes to father of missing boy

Police Commissioner Ray Kelly paid a visit Saturday to the father of Avonte Oquendo and expressed regret for saying he feared the missing 14-year-old autistic boy was dead.

"He was very nice to me,'' Daniel Oquendo told The Post. "He apologized.''

Kelly assured the family the search would continue for Avonte, who walked out of his Long Island City, Queens, school more than three weeks ago and hasn't been seen since.

On Thursday, Kelly told WABC/Channel 7: "Unfortunately, we are not hopeful that we're going to find this young man alive, but we are continuing our search.''

The pessimistic comment infuriated the boy's family, prompting the commissioner's visit.

In an interview with WPIX/Channel 11 after he met with Kelly, the dad described the commissioner as a "stand-up guy.''


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

Woman slain, 5 hurt in New Haven nightclub shooting

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — One woman was killed and five people were injured at a New Haven nightclub early Saturday.

Gunfire rang out inside the Key Club Cabaret at 3:30 a.m., and more than 100 patrons fled through the main doorway, police said.

Erica Robinson, 26, of West ­Haven, died and Jahad Brumsey, 29, of West Haven, was critically injured, police said. Four others, ages 19 to 34, were treated for injuries that were not considered life-threatening.

No suspect has been identified. Police have been interviewing several witnesses.

The interior of the club was littered with drug paraphernalia and smelled of marijuana, police said.

Gov. Dannel Malloy and Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman issued a statement saying, "Connecticut cities still suffer too often from the plague of gun violence."


18.18 | 0 komentar | Read More

’99 grand jury indicted Ramseys for fatal child abuse

Written By kom nampuldu on Sabtu, 26 Oktober 2013 | 20.49

Three years after the brutal killing of pint-sized beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey, her parents were indicted for being complicit in her murder, newly unsealed court papers revealed.

John and Patsy Ramsey put their 6-year-old in a dangerous situation and helped her killer, according to Colorado grand-jury documents released Friday.

The panel voted in 1999 to charge the couple in separate but identical indictments with one count of child abuse resulting in death and one count of accessory to a crime.

JonBenet RamseyPhoto: ZUMAPPRESS.com

The long-sealed paperwork did not indicate who might have murdered JonBenet, whose bludgeoned and strangled body was found in the basement of the family's ­Boulder home on Dec. 26, 1996.

The little girl was found with duct tape covering her mouth, a cord around her neck and evidence that she had been garroted and sexually tortured.

The documents were ordered released Friday by a Colorado Superior Court judge in response to a lawsuit brought by a Boulder ­reporter and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

The child-abuse indictments state that John and Patsy Ramsey "unlawfully, knowingly, recklessly and feloniously" allowed their daughter to be "unreasonably placed in a situation which posed a threat of injury to the child's life or health" and which "resulted in the death of JonBenet Ramsey."

According to the accessory indictments, the Ramseys "render[ed] assistance to a person" in an effort to hinder or prevent the discovery of with intent to hinder, delay and prevent the discovery, detention, apprehension, prosecution, conviction and punishment of such person for the commission of a crime, knowing the person being assisted has committed and was suspected of the crime of murder in the first degree and child abuse resulting in death."

The district attorney at the time, Alex Hunter, refused to sign the indictment papers and declined to prosecute, citing a lack of evidence.

JonBenet's murder made worldwide headlines as glam photos and videos of the little girl dressed in adult makeup and suggestive poses were released in the media.

In 2008, new DNA evidence showed that JonBenet's killer was an unknown male.

In that same year, the Ramseys and all immediate family, including JonBenet's brother, Burke, were exonerated by Boulder District Attorney Mary Lacy.

John Ramsey had asked the court to release all of the grand jury report, rather than just the unprosecuted indictment portion released Friday. He argued that a partial release would give a skewed view of the case.

Patsy, who died in 2006, and John always maintained their innocence.

Boulder Police Chief Mark Beckner said the case remains open but not active and said the release of the indictments likely won't change anything.

"Given the publicity that's been out there, many people have formed their opinions one way or another," he said.

With AP


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More

Yankees, Mets must weigh Drew’s playoff slump

Three thoughts on World Series Game 2, a 4-2 Cardinals win over the Red Sox:

1. The Mets and Yankees are going to have to ask themselves how much this postseason matters for player of interest Stephen Drew because his offensive performance is ranking among the worst ever.

He is 4-for-42 with one extra-base hit (a triple), one walk and 15 strikeouts. He is hitting .095, making Nick Swisher look productive at this time of year. Also, Drew is about to become more important to the Red Sox lineup, which is likely to lose Mike Napoli (so David Ortiz can play first) in Games 3-5 in the NL city St. Louis.

Boston manager John Farrell could switch Xander Bogaerts from third to short and re-insert Will Middlebrooks at third. But I don't think he will do that because St. Louis has an all-righty rotation (and Drew hits lefty). But mainly because whatever his offensive faults, Drew has not taken them into the field. I have been at every Red Sox game this postseason and one of my "I didn't know that" realizations is just how good a defender Drew is. Which is something else the Mets and Yankees must consider.

Drew has terrific hands and an accurate arm and way more range than I was anticipating for someone who missed the second half of the 2011 season and the first half of 2012 after fracturing his right ankle.

He positions himself well, but he also has good range both ways and an accurate arm. Drew produces a couple of plays a game that makes you take notice, that make you put a star in your scorebook.

Drew is a free agent this offseason. He turns 31 in March, and after hitting 13 homers and producing a .777 OPS this year to go along with the strong defense, the expectation is the Red Sox will put the $14.1 million qualifying offer on him and probably would like to keep him.

He is looking at a three- or four-year contract in the $12-million-per-year territory. The Mets are looking to replace Ruben Tejada, but might not want to allocate those kind of funds for Drew.

The Yanks need insurance on both Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez — when I ask Red Sox people, they believe Drew could handle third base. The Yanks are trying to get under the $189 million luxury-tax threshold for next season, and who else takes – or doesn't take – their money will motivate how hard they push on Drew.

2. Michael Wacha gave up two runs in six innings in Game 2. Just to accentuate how great he has been in this postseason, that was one more run than he had given up in his first three starts, covering 21 innings.

Still, he was impressive against the best lineup in the majors, getting through the Boston order the first time with mainly his fastball and changeup before mixing in his curve. He improved to 4-0 in four postseason starts this October. Yes, the Cardinals have won eight games in these playoffs, and a kid with nine career regular-season starts has half of them.

At 22 years, 114 days old, he became the youngest righty to start and win a World Series game since Cleveland's Jaret Wright (21 years, 297 games) won Game 4 of the 1997 Fall Classic against the Marlins. He is the youngest Cardinal to win a World Series game since rookie Paul "Daffy" Dean earned the victories in Games 3 and 6 (22 years and 55 days old in Game 6) to help the Gashouse Gang beat the Tigers in 1934. His older brother, Dizzy, produced the other two St. Louis wins in the Series.

"[Wacha] continues to impress," Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. "I don't know what else you can say."

Eighteen teams passed on Wacha in the first round of the 2012 draft. Among them were the Mets, who with the 12th pick selected high school shortstop Gavin Cecchini. He is just 19, but has yet to play above short-season Single-A at Brooklyn.

3. Ortiz did not hit a postseason homer in his first 14 games and 50 at-bats, a period in which he played in October for the Twins and Red Sox and hit .200.

But in his past 64 playoff games, Ortiz has hit 17 homers. He is kind of the anti-A-Rod: He has essentially skated on associations with illegal performance-enhancers, and there is a perception that all he hits is big homers, especially at this time of year.

He hit another huge one in World Series Game 2, the two-run shot off Wacha that gave Boston a 2-1 lead in the sixth. That was the ninth of the 17 homers that have either tied the score or put the Red Sox ahead. Actually, only one tied the score: his two-out, eighth-inning grand slam off Tigers closer Joaquin Benoit in Game 2 of this year's ALCS.

Ortiz has two walk-off blasts. The first, a two-run shot off Jarrod Washburn in the 10th inning, clinched the 2004 Division Series sweep of the Angels. In the 2004 ALCS, he hit a two-run homer off Paul Quantrill in the 12th inning of Game 4, which would be the first of four straight Boston wins en route to ending The Curse.

The next night he would homer leading off the eighth to pull Boston within 4-3 and get the walk-off single against Esteban Loaiza to win Game 5.


20.49 | 0 komentar | Read More
techieblogger.com Techie Blogger Techie Blogger